• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: {Daventry only) Recipes suitable for British Legion Women's Section Home Produce competition

THIS morning's talk will be of special interest to members of the Women's Section of the British Legion, as the recipes will have direct reference to their annual Homo Produce Competition. A further series will be broadcast on March 12.

: A CONCERT

MARY OGDEN (Contralto)
ANDREW BROWN 'S QUINTET

: Alphonse du Clos and his Orchestra

From the Hotel Cecil

2.0 2.25 (Daventry only)
Experimental Transmission of Still Pictures by the Fultograph process

: BROADCAST TO SCHOOLS :

Sir WALFORD DAVIES :
(a) A Beginner's Course
(b) An Intermediate Course with Short Concert
(c) A Short Advanced Course

: LOUIS LEVY'S ORCHESTRA

Conducted by ARNOLD EAGLE
From the Shepherd's Bush Pavilion

: BROADCAST TO SCHOOLS:;

Mr. FREDERICK E. TOWNDROW
Adventures in ‘Architecture?II, The Present'
IN fhis first talk Mr. Towndrow examined some of the. great buildings of the past to aee how they fulfilled the three great laws of architecture. This afternoon he deals in the same way with some of the notable achievements of our own time ; buildings so different as American skyscrapers, German power-houses, the new Horticultural Hall in London, and the Stadium at Wembley.

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR:

' The Dicky-Bird Hop' and other favourites by RONALD GOURLEY
' Zoo Music,' with LESLIEG. MAINLAND as ' Chef d'Orchèstre'
' The Otter's Inn '—another Mortimer Batten
Story

: A READING OF POETRY

by SIEGFRIED SASSOON

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

BEETHOVEN—VARIATIONS for Pianoforte
Played by V. HELY-HUTCHINSON
VARIATIONS as a form are somehow not
' popular with the ordinary listener; it may be that the young aspirant for mastery over a musical instrument, especially the pianoforte, is given an overdose of variations in his apprenticeship. They ought to bo popular ; there is a special interest in following the transformations of a tune through the various moods with which a composer can invest it, and composers havo always been attracted by the form. Beethoven, especially, made great use of variations, and found them flow so happily from his thought that it was evidently difficult for him to stop. When he was asked, for instance, to compose one of a set of variations which was being made on a waltz by DiabeUi, he composed no fewer than thirty-three. For the pianoforte, by itself, and along with other instruments, he gave us as many as twenty-nine sots of variations, some on themes of his own, some on other people's tunes. And besides these, many of the movements in his symphonies and chamber music pieces are variations, either so called or series of free variants on the theme with which he sets out.
There are various ways in which a set of variations can be built up. The simplest and most obvious is to keep the tune in its original shape and to embroider it with different kinds of accompaniment, usually growing more and more elaborate as the pieco proceeds. Most listeners must have heard such variations on ' Annie Laurie ' and other favourite airs. Another plan is to keep the harmonic base of the tune, and embellish the melody itself. Beethoven does this in many of his variations with an ease and fertility of invention which were apparently inexhaustible. In almost all of his works, except some of the earliest, there are examples of variations of this kind. It was not actually Beethoven's invention, Haydn and Mozart before him having done something very much the same. But no one, except possibly Schubert, made use of it in so effective and interesting a way.
The third method, and this one Beethoven really did originate, is to make changes in the melody and its rhythm and its harmony all at once, while yet preserving the character of the original tune. In these, it is as though Beethoven evolved, time after time, a new creation out of the mere germ of tho original air.

: Professor W. E. S. Turner, 'Glass in Modern Civilization—VI, The House of. the Future.'

In his final talk Professor Turner is led to consider the houses of the future in their relationship to the probability of increasing largely the proportion of window space in new buildings. He will touch upon such fascinating suggestions as those of houses entirely constructed of glass and will consider the very pressing problem of glass which admits ultra-violet rays.
(S.B. from Sheffield)

: A Light Orchestral Concert

HILDA BLAKE (Soprano)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA.
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL

: Orchestra

Four English Dances in the Olden Style...Cowen
Stately; Rustic; Graceful; Country
This is thoroughly happy music of the kind by which Sir Frederic Cowen is best known - to listeners. Eminently sound in workmanship - that goes without saying - these four Dances are all bright and tuneful, and each has its own grace and charm. The first is a 'Stately Dance' in a. moderate four in the bar; the second, a 'Rustic Dance,' is full of vigour, and at times even boisterous; the third trips along on dainty feet, in keeping with its name, 'Graceful Dance,' and in the fourth we return to the more heavy-footed dance of the country. There are two contrasted sections, the first sturdy and energetic, the second more sedate, as though the lads and lasses of the village took turns in dancing for us. But at the end the two figures combine to form a really boisterous close.

: Sir Walford Davies: Music and the Ordinary Listener

Contributors

Speaker: Sir Walford Davies

: Vaudeville

A VARIETY .ITEM from
THE LONDON COLISEUM and MURRAY ASHFORD 'S CONCERT PARTY








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel