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Listings

: A STUDIO CONCERT

OLIVE DAVIES (Mezzo-Soprano)
TREFOR GLYN (Tenor) MONA LEIGH (Violin)

: Evensong

From Westminster Abbey

: LETTERS FROM OVERSEAS

NOW that so many families in Great Britain have a relative settled somewhere in the Empire overseas, there is naturally very much interest in accounts of Dominion and colonial life. This series of broadcasts will describe the fortunes of individual settlers and of a typical family in various 'foreign parts.' It will be introduced this afternoon by Dame Meriel Talbot , who is Intelligence Officer to the Overseas Settlement Department.

: A Brass Band Concert

JESSIE CORMACK (Pianoforte)
CALLENDER'S BAND
Conducted by Tom MORGAN

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

FOURTH DAY OF REQUEST WEEK
' The Dicky-Bird Hop,' ' The Village Band,' and Improvisations by RONALD GOURLEY
'The Children of the Heather' (H. Mortimer
Batten) told by DEREK McCULLOCH
'Grousing,' How to Sell Eggs ' and ' Farmer
Giles,' by FREDERICK CHESTER
'Rosemary Ann,' 'Birthdays,' and other songs at the piano, composed and sung by HELEN ALSTON

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

Songs by RICHARD STRAUSS
Sung by JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor)

: Hallé Concert

Relayed from the Free Trade Hall
S.B. from Manchester
THE HALLÉ ORCHESTRA
Conducted by SIR HAMILTON HARTY
IT was Mendelssohn himself who gave this
Symphony its name. It was largely written during travels in Italy in 1831, and embodies much of the brightness and sunshine which ho enjoyed so thoroughly there.
The principal tune of the first movement is played at the outset by the violins, a tune which bubbles over with exhilaration and freshness. Mendelssohn himself said that this was going to be the gayest orchestral music he had ever written, and from the outset it is easy to agree with him. The second main tune, no loss joyous than tho first, is played to begin with by clarinets and bassoons, and as the first part of the movement ends, there is a gracious little melody which appears again in the coda. At the beginning of the working-out section a new theme is begun by second violins, on which a short Fugato is built up, leading to the return of the first theme. The second theme is then heard as a violoncello solo.
For some unknown reason the second movement has been given the name The Pilgrims' March.' The principal tune is begun by violas and woodwinds, and carried on by violins along with flutes. There is another tune in the second part of the movement which clarinets play first. The movement is quiet and serious in mood as compared with the others.
The third movement is not really a scherzo; something like a Minuet, it has a gracious tune which strings play first. In the alternative section (the Trio) there is an important phrase for horns and bassoons, to which first violins and then flutes reply.
The last movement is a very light-hearted and bustling Saltarollo or Tarantella in which there are three tunes, all vigorous merry dance rhythms.

: Halle Concert

(Continued)
THIS Concerto is in the usual three movements. the first being the longest and most elaborate. Ihere is a full-sized introduction by the orchestra in which the main theme is heard at the beginning. There are two other themes, of which the second, by its rhythm, has a big influence on the whole course of the movement. The solo violin, when it enters, has a brilliant passage leading up to the first main theme, which it follows soon afterwards with the follows soon afterwards with the second principal tune. It has another broad melody in double notes, and still one other new melody, also in double notes. Towards the end, in the usual place, there is a great Cadenza for which Joachim is thought to be responsible.
The second movement is begun by the oboe, and the whole short movement is in the meditative mood which the opening suggests,
The last movement is in Rondo form. that is the form in which the main tune keeps on coming back after other themes have appeared. The solo instrument begins with the main theme.
ARTHUR CATTERALL
Violin Solos
ORCHESTRA
Overture, 'Carnival in Paris' Svendsen
LIKE most of Svendson's music, the Carnival in Paris is cosmopolitan rather than specially Scandinavian ; it bears the impress of a sturdy individuality, and. like all his work, is marked by very careful, tidy, craftsmanship. Owing its origin to the composer's happy experience of the gay city at the time when the Second Empire was flourishing, it is a lively, highly effective piece of descriptive music which is happily described by Its own title.
The chief tune seems at first unwilling to let itself bo heard in full, but emerges anon in a very merry, bustling guise. It is succeeded by a sprightly, dainty, tune, one which undergoes' many transformations as the different instruments toss it about. It appears later in a much slower and more suave form, to return presently in its original mood of merriment. The different tunes are used singly and together in the most effective way, and the carnival grows more and more boisterous as it proceeds, to end in a regular outbreak of mirth and bustle.

ARTHUR CATTERALL (Violin), with - Orchestra
Concerto in D - Brahms
ORCHESTRAJune Twilight (Conducted by THE COMPOSER) - Eric Fogg

: STUDENTS' SONGS

THE WIRELESS MALE VOICE CHORUS
Conducted by LESLIE WOODGATE








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