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: (Daventry only) Menus and Receipes : More Ways of Cooking Potatoes

THE morning is the most appropriate time
for recipes, for it is during the morning, in most households, that the kitchen is the centre of things. The innovation of morning talks will enable housewives to learn now ways of cooking potatoes whilst the potatoes are actually being peeled.

: A STUDIO CONCERT

WINIFRED OSBORNE (Contralto)
ARTHUR DAVIES (Tenor)
W. H. J. JENKINS (Violin)

: Popular Chamber Music

TERESA GORDON (Mozzo-Soprano)
THE NEW HARMONIC TRIO
ELEANOR HEINE (Violin); KATHLEEN JACOBS ('Cello) ; KATHLEEN MURRAY (Pianoforte)

: Loms LEVY'S ORCHESTRA

Conducted by ARNOLD EAGLE
From the Shepherd's Bush Pavilion

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR :

SECOND DAY OF REQUEST WEEK
'ERBERT AND HIS FAMILY MOVE'
The cast will be as follows :

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

SONGS by ' RICHARD STRAUSS
Sung by JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor)
THOUGH Richard Strauss is best known to the general public as the composer of works in the larger forms, in the shape ot his Symphonic Poems and Operas, he has written also a very great number of songs, which constitute an important part of his total output. There are indeed those who reckon his productions in this branch of the art among his greatest achievements.
Strauss' songs became known early to the British public, since examples of them figured prominently, as some whose memories go back far enough may recall, in the programmes of the famous Strauss Festival, given in London, at the old St. James' Hall in 1903, when they were interpreted with great charm by the composer's wife, at that time a well-known operatic singer, Pauline De Ahna.
In point of style and general character Strauss' songs cover a wide range. Some are deeply felt and expressive, such as ' Traum durch die Dämmerung ' (the most famous of them all), " Zjdibnunb,' ' Ruhe meine Seele,' and many more of tho highest beauty. Others are passionate and brilliant, electrifying in their ardour and glow, such as ' Heimliche Aufforderung ' and ' Cäcilie.' Yet others , of which the Steinklopfers Lied ' is a typical example, deal with the less pleasant aspects of life in a manner appropriately grim and harsh; while others again such as the lovely ' Morgen ' and the delicious 'Muttertäandelei,' are idyllic in their simplicity and charm.
That all are on the same level of inspiration it would of course bo too much to expect, and Strauss has himself explained, in a highly interesting letter which he wrote concerning his methods of composition, why it would be idle to expect this. ' For some time,' he wrote, ' I will have no impulse to compose at all. Then one evening I will bo turning the leaves of a volume of poetry and a poem will strike my eye. I read it through ; it agrees with the mood I am in ; and at once the appropriate music is fitted to it. I am in a musical frame of mind, and all I want is the right poetic vessel into which to pour my ideas. If good luck throws i this in my way a satisfactory song results.' But if, he added, the poem was not the right one, or he was not in the mood, then things worked out very differently and, hard as he might try, the result was never satisfactory.
But this is, of course, the way with all composers. It is only a pity that a larger proportion of Strauss' finest songs are not more regularly sung in England, where the tendency is to ring the changes perpetually on just a few of the best known, and many will doubtless be glad to make acquaintance with some of the less familiar examples which Mr. John Armstrong is introducing.

: Sir JOHN CADMAN, K.C.M.G. : ' Mining Areas and Industrial Transference'

WHEN an industry shrinks to such an extent that a large number of those living on it can no longer hope to derive their subsistence from it, such measures as unemployment pay and Poor Law relief can be no more than palliativcs. The real solution is to be found rather in the work of the Industrial Transference Board, which was established by the Government a year ago, for the purpose of facilitating the transfer of workers, and in particular of miners, for whom opportunities of employment, in their own districts or occupation wore no longer available.' Sir John Cadman was one of the three members of this Board, which visited various mining areas and in their report (presented last June) described the hardship and suffering which long-continued unemployment had brought upon their populations, and affirmed their belief that only in transference to other areas lay any real hope for many of those now unemployed.

: Vaudeville

WISH WYNNE (in Character S'.udies)
YVETTE DARNAC (in French Songs)
JOHN HENRY
THREE lRRESPONSIBLES
(In Syncopation and Harmony)

: CAN YOU SYNCOPATE ?

BILLY MAYERL
A Talk on how to play Syncopated Music
Illustrated by JACK PAYNE and THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

: Sir OLIVER LODGE, F.R.S.: Revolu. tionary Discoveries '

THE last few years have seen, in the scientific (iold, many discoveries that are in the most literal sense revolutionary. Tho boundaries set to our knowledge are being broken down at a surprising rate, and we find tho scientists telling us bewildering things about tho nature of matter itself. In tonight's talk Sir Oliver Lodge will review theso enlargements of our knowledge of the universe, and explain what they really imply.

: A Popular Concert

BERTH A ARMSTRONG (Soprano)
THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET








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