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Listings

: Ubc Menin (Bate Service

of the BRITISH LEGION BATTLEFIELDS PIL
GRIMAGE

: A BALLAD CONCERT

FRANCES HATFIELD (Mezzo-Soprano)
FREDERIC LAKE (Tenor)

: THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

Personally conducted by JACK PAYNE

: FRASCATI'S ORCHESTRA

Directed by GEORGES HAECK , from the Restaurant Frascati

: A Light Classical Concert

MILDRED WATSON (Soprano)
FRANK PROBYN (Horn)
OLIVE CLOKE (Pianoforte)

OLIVE CLOKE Symphonic Studies (Op. 13) - Schumann
4.22 MILDRED WATSON L'amour de moi (The love of me) - an. Tiersot
Two songs of Clément Marot - an. Tiersot
Non, je n'irnis plus au bois (No, I should go no more to the wood) - arr. Weckerlin
4.30 FRANK PROBYN Romance - Reger
Piece in D - Büsser
4.38 OLIVE CLOKE Prelude in G Flat (Op. 16) - Scriabm
Rhapsody in E Flat Minor (Op. II) - Do/manyi
4.48 MILDRED WATSON Da die St unde kam (As the hour drew nigh) - Franz
Fur Musik (For Music) - Franz
Und die Rosen die prangen (And the roses may flourish) - Franz
Mailied (May Song) - Franz
4.55 FRANK PROBYN and OLIVE CLOKE Sonata for Horn and Pianoforte - Beethoven

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

‘ The PERFECT HOLIDAY ’
A Play adapted by EVELYN SMITH
From ' Little Women ' (L. M. Alcott )

: THE B.B.C.DANCE ORCHESTRA

Personally conducted by JACK PAYNE

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

Piano DUETS BY DVORAK
Played by ISABEL CRAY and CLAUDE POLLARD
Slavonic Dances , Op. 72
C Major
D Flat Major A Flat Major
F Major

: Vaudeville

WILL HAY (The Schoolmaster Comedian)
VIOLET ESSEX and TUCKER
(The Singing Violinist)
MYLES CLIFTON (Light Comedian)
BETTY CHESTER (Comedy Songa)
THE Two HOFFMANS (Syncopated Pianists)
THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA
Personally conducted by JACK PAYNE

: A Symphony Concert

ELSIE SUDDABY (Soprano)
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Leader,
S. KNEALE KELLEY ). Conducted by G. LESLIE HEWARD
THIS, one of two solo Cantatas for Soprano which Bach wrote, is for the 15th Sunday after Trinity. It begins with a florid air, the Trumpet joining in the exhortation to rejoice. A Recitative follows, in a spirit of quiet thankfulness for daily mercies. Lastly, there is a Chorale, ' All glory, laud and honour,' rounded off by a ' 'Hallelujah' in which the Trumpet again is prominent. (Soloist, ELSIE SUDDABY> )
BEETHOVEN was not the only Composer to achieve nine Symphonies. Mahler also wrote as many and once said that an emotional listener might get to know his whole mental development from them. Perhaps that is too large a claim ; but some elements in his mind are clearly discernible almost always-in particular, his strong romantic trait.
This is noticeable in the Fourth Symphony, which contains four Movements.
The FIRST MOVEMENT, moving at a comfortable, moderate pace, contains a good many tunee,
. one or two of which are largely used-the first main theme, heard at the opening, and a little Horn passage that follows straight after it, The second main tune sings out from the Violoncellos, in their high register. The music runs its bright, amiable course, and then comes the SECOND MOVEMENT, with easy motion, un-hurrying.' Here a Solo Violin is used, in addition to the normal body of fiddlers. The Horn has the opening tune, and this Soloist the second. The Muted Strings have a Third (rather like an old-fashioned German waltz), and the Clarinets a Fourth.
The THIRD MOVEMENT, the Slow one, is peaceful, and, one might say, pastoral in feeling. The Violins open, and in a little the Oboe plaintively gives out a new melody, followed by a third on the Violoncellos, and several others, that gradually lead to a section in rather more animated style, having almost the character of a Minuet. Then the first ideas return and the Movement makes a peaceful ending.
FOURTH MOVEMENT. It is here that the Soprano soloist eomss in, singing an old Bavarian folk-song, that naively sets forth the joys of life in Heaven—mirthful joys, ' with singing and dancing,' good eiting and great contentment. After each verse has been sung, the Orchestra plays reminiscences of some of the First Movement's melodies, and the work ends in quietness.








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