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: LIGHT Music

THE RUDI SZEMINANJI TRIO
MARGARET DALMEYDA (Soprano)

: HOLIDAYS ABROAD: Mr. DOUGLAS B. CONNAH, Switzerland '

THE ordinary notion of Switzerland is that of a large number of white mountains entirely surrounded by cows with bells, and tourists with skis and skates. Mr. Douglas Connah will correct this notion this evening. Few places can be so delightful, or so dreary, to the traveller, as Switzerland-according to whether he visits the right or wrong places for the right or wrong reasons in the right or wrong company. Mr. Connah knows
' all that is to be known of his subject, and he has even acted professionally as a guide.

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

By special arrangement, Mr. Poldiddle will visit the Studio and will introduce his marvellous Universal Wireless Receiver, the miraculous powers of which are now to be demonstrated for the first time.
N.B.-It has to be heard to be believed, and when you have heard it, you won't believe it.

: The Foundations of Music: Piano Works by Debussy

Played by Laffitte Bruyeres (Heather, from 'Preludes,' Book I)
The Preludes of Debussy contain all kinds of sketches of scenes and people. Most of them are impressionistic, and we need little more than the title to help us to conjure up the scene which the composer has endeavoured to translate into music. A very little exercise of imagination, for instance, enables us to recall, when we hear Bruyeres, the glorious purple and fragrant scent of the springy heather.
Yesterday we heard Debussy's impression of the muffled bells of the cathedral under the waves. Here again, in Pagodas, we get a suggestion of the continuous tinkle of bells. Perhaps the composer imagined them hung all round the pagodas. More probably, he is thinking of those little Chinamen who nod to us from mantelpieces - they also are called pagodas. This piece and the next are from the book entitled Estampes (Engravings).
In the last piece we shelter beneath the canopy of a leafy tree, and watch the steadily falling, gentle rain-shower. We may imagine we hear a distant rumble of thunder and see a flash or two of summer lightning. Then the clouds clear away and the sun bursts out again.

: Prof. F. W. BURSTALL: 'Engines for the Road and the Air-V, Engines for the Air.' Relayed from Birmingham

WHEN internal combustion engines can drive anything from a liner to a wheel-chair; when they can carry an aeroplane miles above the earth's surface, and propel a car along it at speeds approaching two hundred miles an hour-there does not seem to be room for very extensive improvement in its achievement. Yet from the scientific point of view much remains to be done in the way of perfecting the efficiency of the engine and raising the ratio of power obtained to heat supplied. Professor Burstall will examine possible lines of advance in this evening's talk.

: VARIETY

SIDNEY NESBITT and his Ukulele and DICKIE DixoN at the Piano
CATHERINE O'STEVENS in a Berkshire Settle
MEGAN FOSTER (Soprano) in VICTOR HELY-
HUTCHINSON'S compositions with the COMPOSER at the Piano
CLARE GREET in a Sketch
CONCERNING A CALL '
By EVELYN GLOVER
THE PARKlNGTON Quartet

: A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

GLADYS PARR (Contralto)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY
BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL

: DANCE MUSIC : THE PICCADILLY

PLAYERS, under the direction of AL STARITA, and THE PICCADILLY DANCE BANDS, under the direction of CHARLES WATSON , from the Piccadilly Hotel








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