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Listings

: LIGHT Music

THE ALICE ELIESON Trio
Blanche DOUTHWAITE (Mezzo-Soprano)

: Mr. ERIC PARKER : ' Out of Doors from Week to Week-VI, What is a Weed f '

A N old saying describes ' matter out of place 'as ' dirt.' In the same way a plant in the wrong place is a weed. In itself a weed may be interesting to the botanist and pleasing to the eye, and what is a highly-esteemed plant in one country may become a pestilent weed in the different conditions of another. Mr. Eric Parker will give weeds their due in his talk this afternoon.

: Miss NANCY ROSE: 'The Dog in the Home—III, Keeping them fit'

TODAY Miss Nancy Rose will complete her discussion of how to look after your dogs. Next week she will turn to some other pets of inside or outside the house, some of which'are rarer than dogs, and therefore even less generally understood. Among those with which she will deal in the second part of her series are cats, cage birds, rabbits, and guinea-pigs.

: FRED KITCHEN'S ORCHESTRA

From the ASTORIA CINEMA

: AN ORGAN RECITAL BY PATTMAN

From the ASTORIA CINEMA

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

' Prelude ' (Järnefelt) and other selected items, played by the OLOF SEXTET
' The Sole Survivors '-how a hen and a rabbit escaped the hunters, by H. MORTIMER BATTEN
' Insects which imitate plants,' a chat by GUY DOLLMAN

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

BRAHMS' PIANO WORKS played by HOWARD JONES
Capriccio in B Minor, Op. 76, No. 2 Rhapsody in G Minor, Op. 79, No. 2
THE Capriccio in B Minor, a great favourite, is one of the Composer's daintiest pieces-a fanciful, light-hearted, and light-footed conception.
The G Minor Rhapsody is an impassioned utterance. The wide sweep of its melody (note its opening in an arpeggio, a favourite figure of Brahms), the leaping vigour of the succeeding passage, and the following curious portion, marked ' mysterious' (in which the opening arpeggio motif is heard softly in the bass), are striking elements in a piece of uncommon impressiveness.

: Finance in the Modern World-VI

The Rt. Hon. PHILIP SNOWDEN
' The Relations of Finance, Industry, and Trade '
A NYBODY who has listened to the previous talks in this series will have realized the enormous power that finance wields in the modern world. The concrete embodiment of finance is the bank, particularly the central bank that controls the ' bank rate' and determines the amount of credit available for the business world. In this talk Mr. Philip Snowden , the brilliant economist who was Chancellor of the Exchequer in the Labour Government, will discuss how the banks can most wisely use their power.

: A SONG RECITAL by KEITH FALKNER (Baritone)

Confusa si miri (Confounded and trembling) - Handel, arr. Whittaker
She came to the Village Church - Sormervell
Birds in the high hall garden - Sormervell
Bright is the ring of words - Vaughan Williams
Mohac's Field - arr. Korbay
The Bold Unbiddable Child - Stanford
Drink to me only with thine eyes - Traditional

: CHARLOT'S HOUR-XX

A LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT
Specially devised and arranged by the weUknown theatrical director
ANDRE CHARLOT

: ' LA BOHEME'

Acts II AND III
Relayed from the Royal Opera House,
Covent Garden Marcet INGHILIERI
THE libretto of La Boheme is founded upon
Henri Murger 's novel La Vie do Boheme.'
In Act I Rudolph and Mimi first meet and declare their love.
ACT II
The Second Act is a gay scene in a crowded, noisy square, on a merry Christmas Eve. Schaunard, the musician, Marcel the painter (both of these are Baritones), and Colline the philosopher (Bass) have come to dine at the Cafe Momus. The poet Rudolph (Tenor) brings Mimi (Soprano) to join them. The dinner party is a merry one, the food and drink lavish, for one of the artists has had a windfall.
Presently a coquette, Musetta (Soprano), appears, followed up by a wealthy old man, Alcindoro (Bass). These two sit down to dinner close to the five friends, who recognize Musetta, and pass facetious remarks.
Musotta is, in fact, ån old flame of Marcel's, and tries to attract him, much to his discomfiture. She manages to get rid of her aged admirer for a while, and she and Marcel fall into each other's arms.
Then the military tattoo approaches, and the party of Bohemians, preparing to go home, find they have not enough money to pay for their dinners. Musetta tells the waiter to put everything on her bill, and goes away with the artists and Mimi, leaving the bill for the old man to pay when he returns.
(Interval)
TOPICAL TALK
ACT III
Scene : At the city gate.
This Act brings a great change of feeling in the drama, which is strongly reflected in the music. It is winter, and the curtain rises on a group of scavengers and others, waiting in the raw, frosty early morning for one of the Gates of Paris to be opened. Sounds of revelry, including Musetta's voice, are heard from the tavern near by. Mimi, now apparently weak and ill, enters, and asks at the inn for Marcel, who is living here with Musetta, and who quickly comes to her. She asks him to help her. Quarrels have occurred; she and Rudolph find it difficult to live together, but equally difficult to part. Rudolph enters, and Mimi hides behind a tree. Rudolph, it appears, is torn by jealousy. He tells Marcel much the same tale as has just been heard from Mimi, and also expresses a fear that Mimi is dying. Mimi reveals herself by her coughing and sobbing.
Mimi and Rudolph sadly talk of separating.
Marcel, meanwhile, has hoard Musetta flirting in the inn, and these two, quarrelling, form a quartet with Mimi and Rudolph.
Musetta and Marcel go their own ways, shouting epithets at each other. Mimi and Rudolph move off together, singing ' Shall we await another spring ? '
The remainder of the work tolls of the parting of Rudolph and Mimi, of their reconciliation, and of Mimi's death from consumption.

: DANCE MUSIC

: The SAVOY
ORPHEANS, FRED ELIZALDE and his Music, from the Savov Hotel








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