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Listings

: The CARLTON HOTEL OCTET

Directed by RENE TAPPONNIER
From the Carlton Hotel

: CORELLI WINDEATT'S BAND

CATHCART LYNN (Contralto)
ARTHUR Cox (Tenor)

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

From England to Everest-a picture, in words and music, by JEAN GRANT and P. K. Bose

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

CHOPIN'S STUDIES
Played by SOLOMON (Pianoforte)

: Mr. H. N. CROWE : 'The English Cycling Team for the Olympic Games.'

CYCLE racing is a sport more popular on the Continent and in America than it is here ; the ' Six Jours ' in the Velodroma in Paris, the road races all over France, and the six-day contests in Madison Square Garden excite as much public interest as our own Boat Race or a Test Match at Lords. But all the same, our own racing cyclists reach a very high standard of skill, and there are strong hopes that they will make a very good showing in the forthcoming Olympic Games. This evening Mr. H. N. Crowe. Secretary of the National Cycling Union, will discuss the prospects of the English team.

: A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

SOPHIE ROWLANDS (Soprano)
Tom KINNIBURGH (Bass)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND, conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
WHEN Mendelssohn was a young man of twenty, he paid his first visit to Scotland, and spent six delightful summer weeks in touring the Highlands. His Hebrides Overture and the Scotch Symphony both reflect the experiences of that happy time.
What we are now to hear, then, is a visual and poetic impression, put,into tone.
THE weird legend of Saint-Saens' piece is familiar to most listeners. The version used is that of a poem by Henri Cazalis. The composer gives us a vivid representation of Death fiddling for the midnight capers of skeletons. Their bones knock together, and the dance goes on until cock-crow disperses the ghostly crew.
A S everyone knows, the New
World' of Dvorak's Symphony is America, in which country the composer spent some years, teaching end conducting. His interest in the music of the American Negro led him to give characteristic colour to certain of his works by using themes based on. though not exactly reproducing. Negro popular tunes-the ' spirituals' with which we are now so familiar. The keen response which this Symphony always arouses must be due not a little to its wealth of lovely orchestral colouring. Sometimes we have soft, rich, warm tones, sometimes splendour or brilliance. sometimes the, bright and varied delicacy of mosaic.
The Scherzo reminds us that
Dvorak, the son of a batcher-inn-keeper, never lost his love of peasant ways. There is something here of the countryman's boisterous good humour-almost, we might say, of the horse-play variety.
GLINKA (1804-57), that pioneer of Russian music, one day heard a village wedding song and a country dance (the' Kamarinskaja '), and out of these he made an orchestral piece, lchaikovsky and Itimsky-Korsakov both regarded the piece as the foundation of all orchestral treatment of Russian folk-music.

: DANCE MUSIC

: THE SAVOY OR-
PHEANS, FRED ELIZALDE and his Music, and the SAVOY TANGO BAND, from the Savoy Hotel








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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