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Listings

: AN ORGAN RECITAL

By HAROLD E. DARKE
Relayed from St. Michael's. Cornhill

Overture to ' Samson ' Handel - Slow ; Quick ; Minuet
Psalm Prelude No. 2 - Howells
Chorale and Variations - Bach
Scherzo (Symphony No. 4) - Widor
Prelude and Fugue in C Minor - Bach
Andantino in G Minor - Franck
Pæan - BasilHarwood

: Miss RHODA POWER : Boys and Girls of the Middle Ages— The London Apprentice '

TIFE was carefully organized and laws were strictly enforced in the little London of tho Middle Ages, with its small open-fronted shops and cobbled streets. This afternoon Miss Rhoda Power will talk of mediaeval London, its eraftguilds, master-craftsmen, journeymen and apprentices, the wardens of the trades and the duties they performed.

: AN AFTERNOON CONCERT

SYDNEY BOWMAN'S TRIO
ELLA FRANCK (Contralto)
ALEXANDER MCCREDIE (Baritone)
OLIVE CLOKE (Pianoforte)

: HOUSEHOLD TALK : Mrs. COTTINGTON TAYLOR, Christmas Cakes '

EVEN in these days of restaurant moals and food in packets, every self-respecting housekeeper makes a point of celebrating Christinas with the produce of her own kitchen, and Christmas cake is one of the easier things to make. Mrs. Cottington-Taytor. director of the Good Housekeeping Institute, will give some good advice as to how to concoct that thick, rich, fruity mixture that has been responsible for so many bad dreams on Christmas night.

: ENGLAND v WALES

An Eye-Witness Account of the International Association Football
. Match. by Mr. STACEY LINTOTT
8.B.fromManchester

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

MENDELSSOHN'S SONGS WITHOUT WORDS
Played by HAROLD RUTLAND
(Pianoforte)
[During the following fortnight, Mendelssohn's Songs without Words will be played straight through in their correct order at this time.]
GROVE used a good expression when he praised Mendelssohn's Songs without Words for their ' domestic character.' The intimate charm of the pieces is most happily evoked when we hear them in the friendly surroundings of home. Perhaps they are not quite so widely played as at one time. It is interesting to note, however, that in the early days of publication very few copies of the first book were sold-only a little over a hundred in the first four years. There is always a corner in our affections for these expressive melodies, with their musicianly, resourceful treatment of pieces ' quite full of beauty,' as Brahms described them.
The general title Songs without Words is
Mendelssohn's own, but of the many names by which individual pieces are known, only a few were invented by the composer. They are those of the two Gondola Songs, the Duet, the Folk Song, and the Spring Song ; all other titles were devised hy publishers or the public. < Generations of players and listeners have enjoyed making up their own pleasant fancies about the Songs, and so, probably, will the audience of lo-duy.

: A RF.CTTAL OF FOLK SONGS

by DALE SMITH (Baritone)

: A NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERT

THE NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,
Conducted by Sir LANDON RONALD
GUILHERMINA SUGGIA ('Cello)

ORCHESTRA Overture to ; La Nozzo de Figaro ' - Mozart
Symphony in C - Schubert

: National Symphony Concert

(Continued)
THE Symphonic Variations start with a dignified Introduction in a minor key, in which the soloist has some passage-work of a showy kind. before coming, at a change of time and key, to the main body of the work. in this the smooth, flowing 'Cello melody is varied in many ways, the treatments being fairly closely knit together in the latter part of the work.
Boellmann, the clever and prolific Alsatian
Composer, lived only thirty-five years.
INA BOYLE , an Irish Composer of the present. day, received one of the Carnegie Trust's awards for her Rhapsody The Magic Harp. Its poetic basis comes from a legend thus told by Eva Gore-Booth in a note to her poem The Harper's Song of the Seasons : :--
The Durd-Alba (the wind among the apple trees) was the magical harp of the ancient gods of Ireland. It had three strings — the iron string of sleep, the bronze string of laughter, and the silver string, the sound or which made all men weep. These three strings were also supposed to evoke the three seasons into which the year was then divided.
There are, after the slow introduction, three clear sections of the piece, each preceded by a silent bar and a pause. These portions may be taken as suggesting'respectively the iron, bronze, and silver strings.
[N Festivities (the first of three Nocturnes), Debussy intended to make a musical picture of ' the restless dancing-rhythm of the atmosphere interspersed with sudden of light.' There is also,' be said, ' an incidental procession (a dazzling imaginary vision) passing through and mingling wit the aerial revelry ; but the background of uninterrupted festival is persistent, with its blending of music and luminous dust participating in the universal rhythm of all things.'
Thus the aim is to give, in terms of sound, impressions of the rhythmic effects of light of and the sea's undulations.








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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