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Listings

: AN ORGAN RECITAL

By the Rev. CYRIL JACKSON
Relayed from Southwark Cathedral
THE lunch-time organ recitals from
Southwark Cathedral have made listeners familiar with the playing of the Rev. Cyril Jackson , and they will not be surprised to learn that he originally intended to take up music as a profession. His course at the Royal College of Music was, however, interrupted by the war, and certain circumstances during his service as an airman made him decide to take Holy Orders. He is now Succentor of Southwark Cathedra!.

: Household Talk : Mrs. COTTINGTON TAYI.OR, ' Autumn Preserves '

A S many listeners will be aware, Mrs. Cottington Taylor is Director of the Good Housekeeping ' Institute, and an authority on all matters pertaining to the management of the home. Her previous talk from London was very popular, and housewives will be very glad to hear her again.

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

: Piano Solos by Cecil Dixon. Songs by George Pizzey. Do you know the Story of ' Old Man's Beard ' ? No ? Then listen, and hear Christine Chaundler's version of it. Kenneth Maclennan (with the aid of a ' dry-land ' Studio victim) will give practical instruction on The Crawl Stroke ' in Swimming

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

THE SUITES OF HANDEL
Played by GERDA NETTE

: VARIETY

HAMILTON SISTERS (Syncopation)
YVETTE DARNAC (Light Comedienne)
CHARLES HESLOP and CYRIL SMITH (Entertainers)

: SENTIMENT WITHOUT SYNCOPATION

(For programme see centre column)

: CHAMBER MUSIC AND A PLAY

DAISY KENNEDY (Violin); IRENE SCHARRER
(Pianoforte)
' PARIAH '
By AUGUST STRINDBERG
Characters :
Mr. X, an Archaeologist.....middle-aged men
Mr. Y, an American traveller middle-aged men
Scene : A simply-furnished room in a farm-house. The door and the windows open on a landscape. In the middle of the room stands a big dining-table, covered at one end by hooks, writing materials, and antiquities; at the other end by a microscope, insect cases and specimen jars full of alcohol.
On the left side hangs a bookshelf. Otherwise, the furniture is that of a well-to-do farmer.
The landscape outside and the room itself are steeped in sunlight. The ringing of church bells indicates that the morning services are just over. Now and then the cackling of hens is heard from the outside.
Mr. Y comes in in his shirt-sleeves, carrying a butterfly-net and a botany-can. He goes straight up to the bookshelf and takes down a book, which he begins to read on the spot.
Mr. X comes in, also in his shirt-sleeves.
Mr. Y starts violently, puts the book back on the shelf upside down, and pretends to be looking for another volume.
Mr. X speaks.
THE work of August Strindberg, the Swedish
-L writer, who died in 1912, is still little known in England outside the circle of those who study the drama ; but fifty years ago his plays and novels convulsed the intellectual world by their attacks on modem society, and particularly on the feminist movement to which the other great Scandinavian playwright of the day, Ibsen, had given such support.








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
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