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Listings

: An Afternoon Concert

The Station Orchestra, conducted by Warwick Braithwaite

Solo Violins: Leonard Busfield and Frank Thomas. Solo 'Cello: Ronald Harding

Contributors

Musicians: The Station Orchestra
Orchestra conducted by: Warwick Braithwaite
Violinist: Leonard Busfield
Violinist: Frank Thomas
Cellist: Ronald Harding

: Letters from a Thames Backwater

Elspeth Scott

Contributors

Speaker: Elspeth Scott

: The Dansant

from the Carlton Restaurant.

: The Children's Hour

The Station Orchestra

Contributors

Musicians: The Station Orchestra

: Our Weekly Sports Review

Capt. A. S. Burge and Leigh Woods

Contributors

Speaker: Capt. A.S. Burge
Speaker: Leigh Woods

: S.B. from London

(9.30 Local Announcements)

: The King's Highway

A Programme for the increasing number of listeners who camp out with portable sets. Listeners find themselves given the freedom of the road, and the play by Ben R. Gibbs - brings all the excitement of highway robbery to an age in which such occurrences are becoming almost legendary

The Station Orchestra
conducted by Warwick Braithwaite

Contributors

Musicians: The Station Orchestra
Orchestra conducted by: Warwick Braithwaite

: The King's Highway: Proved

A Play in One Scene by Ben R. Gibbs.

When old Rhys ap Richard has the ancient Grandfather's clock taken from his house to be sold, we learn that the activities of a Highwayman are responsible for this sudden uprooting of a family heirloom.
His daughter Gwynneth is less concerned with heirlooms than with her father's prejudice against her lover, and the said lover independently comes to the conclusion that he must cut a more manly figure in the old man's eyes.
Scene: Rhys ap Richard's old Welsh house.
The time of the action is evening in the winter of the year 1802.
After an evening in the open by the roadside fire there comes drowsiness. The highwayman peril is over, and we have met the pair who have been to Gretna Green. The beat of the horses' feet dies in the distance, the fire smoulders and we settle down for the night, to the rhythm of Galloping Home.

10.19 Orchestra
(to 23.00)

Contributors

Writer: Ben R. Gibbs
Rhys ap Richard: Jacque Thomas
Gwynneth Richard, his daughter: Vera Meazey
Mervyn Rhydderch: Sidney Evans








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
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