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: A Varied Concert

The Station Orchestra
conducted by Warwick Braithwaite

Contributors

Musicians: The Station Orchestra
Conductor: Warwick Braithwaite

: A Varied Concert: John Booth (Tenor)

Contributors

Tenor: John Booth

: A Varied Concert: The Lyrian Singers

Contributors

Singers: The Lyrian Singers

: A Varied Concert: John Booth

Contributors

Tenor: John Booth

: A Varied Concert: Orchestra

Happiness came to Beethoven when, in 1806, he became engaged to the Countess
Therese of Brunswick. The engagement, alas, camo to nothing in the end, but for the time being the Composer was in bliss; and this Symphony, written soon after that happy period began, was surely affected by his joyful feelings, for it is one of the most exhilarating of all the nine Symphonies. It is in four Movements.
First Movement. A slow Introduction precedes the lively Movement, whose First Main Tune is heard on Strings and answered by Woodwind. Quickly there comes a lull, but equally quickly the whole Orchestra takes up the First Tune once again, this time ending with violent, insistent chords, 'off the beat'. Strings are then suddenly left to themselves, and die down to a soft chord. This they hold while the Second Main Tune is heard, a rustic little phrase in Bassoon, then Oboe, then high up in the Flute, which prolongs the Tune. This leads into other Tunes-first a boisterous one, then a quiet conversational one in Woodwind. There is still more material, but this is the most important, and rules a delightful piece in which some attractive novelty is for ever cropping up.
Second Movement. This is in strict 'Sonata' form. It opens with a sustained, song-like First Main Tune in Strings. This is repeated by Woodwind, with decoration in Violins and pizzicato (plucked) accompaniment in the lower Strings. Afterwards something of a climax is developed by Full Orchestra. When this dies down, the Clarinet gives out the Second Main Tune, another song-like melody. There is a soft string accompaniment. After this there is a very brief development section, followed by a regular recapitulation of the two Main Tunes.
Third Movement. A gay Minuet (with the usual 'Trio' as contrast in the middle) needs no special description. For once, however, Beethoven, after repeating his Minuet, gives both Minuet and Trio again, making a five-section piece.
Fourth Movement. A glorious bit of the cheeriest Beethoven, this, woven out of the usual two Main Tunes (First going off at once, and Second entering, after a Full Orchestral climax and a dying down of the excitement, quietly and expressively).

: A Varied Concert: John Booth

Contributors

Tenor: John Booth

: A Varied Concert: Leonard Busfield (Solo Violin)

Contributors

Violinist: Leonard Busfield

: A Varied Concert: The Lyrian Singers

Contributors

Singers: The Lyrian Singers

: English Presbyterian Service

Relayed from the Central Hall Presbyterian Church, Newport.
Organ Voluntary played by Arthur E. Sims
Invocation
Hymn, 'Jerusalem, the Golden' (Tune, 'Ewing')
Reading from the Scriptures
Hymn, 'Hold Thou My Hand'
Prayer
Sermon by the Rev. H. G. Howell
Hvmn, 'Saviour, Again to Thy Dear Name We Raise' (Tune, 'Ellers')
Vesper

Contributors

Organist: Arthur E. Sims
Soloist: Doris Morgan
Speaker: The Rev. H. G. Howell

: The Week's Good Cause: The Missions to Seamen Institute, Bute Docks

Mr. G. Leighton Seager, Vice-Chairman of the Shipowners' Association.

Contributors

Speaker: G. Leighton Seager








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