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Listings

: A Symphony Concert

Relayed from THE PAVILION, Bournemouth
(No. X of the 35th Winter Series)
ANTON RUBINSTEIN CENTENARY
THE BOURNEMOUTH MUNICIPAL SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Conductor, Sir DAN GODFREY
Triumphal Overture
Pianoforte Concerto in D Minor
Moderate ; Moderate assai; Allegro assai
(WILLOUGHBY WALMISLEY)
Extracts, 'The Ocean Symphony'
Allegro; The Storm; Adagio-Allegro con fuoco

Contributors

Unknown: Anton Rubinstein
Conductor: Sir Dan Godfrey

: ORGAN MUSIC

Played by REGINALD NEW
Relayed from the Beaufort Cinema,
Washwood Heath , Birmingham

Contributors

Played By: Reginald New
Unknown: Washwood Heath

: The Children's Hour

-(From Birmingham)
Grandpa Grumble at the Party'-a Play by GLADYS WARD
Songs by BETTY BOND (Soprano) and ALFRED BUTLER (Baritone)
CYRIL DAVIS (Violin)

Contributors

Unknown: Grandpa Grumble
Play By: Gladys Ward
Songs By: Betty Bond
Baritone: Alfred Butler
Violin: Cyril Davis

: ' The First News '

; WEATHER FORE
CAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

: ORGAN MUSIC

Played by Dr. HAROLD RHODES
Relayed from Coventry Cathedral

Contributors

Played By: Dr. Harold Rhodes

: JACK PAYNE

and his B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

: A Wagner Concert

Relayed from the Town Hall, Birmingham
THE CITY of BIRMINGHAM ORCHESTRA
Conducted by ADRIAN BouLT
ROSINA BUCKMAN (Soprano)
FRANK MULLINGS (Tenor)
Overture, ' The Mastersingcrs '
Duet, 'Tristan and Isolda,' Act 11
Tannhauser's Narration ('Tannhauser ) Siegfried Idyll
Tristan and Parsifal were both running in Wagner's mind while he was at work on the Nibelung's Ring, and in the summer of 1857 he put the big work aside, partly because he had begun to doubt whether there was any chance of its ever coming to performance. Just then he was waited on by an envoy from the Emperor of Brazil with a request that he would compose an opera specially for Rio de Janeiro. Taken somewhat by surprise, Wagner gave no definite answer, but began work, nevertheless, on Tristan. He has left it on record that the poem and the music were written with ' an artist's perfect abandonment in his task,' and he had no doubt himself that the union of poetry and music was the moat completely satisfying of any he had achieved. But some years elapsed before the opera was produced, one disappointment after another delaying the performance, and only gradually did it win its way to the position it now holds.
The story is known to every good Briton; the germ of it is in our good Sir Thomas Malory s
'Morted'Arthur.' In Wagner's opera, the second Act is chiefly given to a long love duet between Tristan and Isolda at night in the garden of the King's palace.
TANNUÃUSER had been to Rome with a band of pilgrims to pray for forgiveness. His sin was that he had been beguiled into the magic Grotto of the goddess Venus, and in the great contest of song before the Court, had boasted of its unholy joys. In the third Act, the pilgrims return without him and the Princess Elizabeth, who has never ceased to pray for him, dies of her grief. After the others, Tannhauser drags his weary body along. Meeting Wolfram, he treats him first as an enemy, and only gradually, learning of his friendly thoughts, tells him of his trials and sufferings on the pilgrimage, and how the Pope refused him pardon for so grievous a sin.

Contributors

Conducted By: Adrian Boult
Soprano: Rosina Buckman
Unknown: Sir Thomas Malory

: READING

Mr. RONALD WATKINS reading 'Frost in April.' by MALACHI WHITAKER

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Ronald Watkins
Unknown: Malachi Whitaker

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: ' Love in Greenwich Village'

Being a Modernized Version of ' Love in a Village








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

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Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

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