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Listings

: ORGAN MUSIC

Played by LEONARD H. WARNER
Relayed from ST. BOTOLPH'S, Bishopsgate

Contributors

Played By: Leonard H. Warner

: DANCE MUSIC

JACK PAYNE and THE B.B.C
DANCE ORCHESTRA
HARLEY and BARKER (Syncopated Harmony)

Contributors

Unknown: Jack Payne

: The Children's Hour

(From Birmingham)
' Mounting Snaps for Christmas Cards,' by Hugo Van Wadenoyen
Soprano Songs by HILDA ABBOTT
' The Locomotive Engine,' by E. W. Anderson
BRIAN VICTOR will Entertain

Contributors

Soprano: Hugo Van Wadenoyen
Songs By: Hilda Abbott
Unknown: E. W. Anderson
Unknown: Brian Victor

: ' The First News '

; WEATHER FORE
CAST, FIRST GENERAL News BULLETIN

: Light Music

(From Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis

: ' SALOME'

An Opera by RICHARD STRAUSS relayed from
THE COLOGNE OPERA HOUSE
S.B. from Cologne
THE dreadful story of Salome has attracted artists of almost every order throughout the ages, but none has realized the grim horror of the tragedy with the intensity with which Strauss's music sets it before us. His one-act Music-drama was written to a German version of Oscar Wilde's French play, and appeared in Dresden at the end of 1905. Its first German performance in Paris was in 1907, although before that it had been given in French in Brussels. New York also heard it in 1907 at the Metropolitan Opera House, and three years later it was given in London at Covent Garden.
Strauss himself calls the work not an Opera, but a Drama, and one of the severest criticisms hurled at it when it appeared was that it gave the performers no real chance of singing, but only of shrieking their emotions of fear and horror. The singers must be thought of in the first instance as actors, and it is the orchestra, rather than their voices, which describes end accentuates the emotions and incidents set before us on the stage.
The central point of the whole work is a purely orchestral passage, the Dance of the Seven Veils, and even those who disliked the work as a whole have always agreed that this is as fine a piece of orchestral tone-painting as even Strauss has ever given us. But several of the other scenes are hardly less eloquently described in the music ; in particular, the crowd of quarrelling Jews in the early part is as clever as it is effective, and Salome's raptures on her first siglit of John-called in the German version, Jokannan-is a wonderful setting of barbaric, passionate desire.
The characters are Herod and his wife, Herodias, her daughter Salome, Jokannan, who is -John the Baptist, and the young soldier, Narraboth, whose duty it is to guard Jokannan in his prison. There are minor parts, too, but the action is mainly in the hands of these five, and all takes place on the great terrace in Herod's palace, at Tiberias.

Contributors

Unknown: Richard Strauss

: An Hour of Requests

(From, Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO CHORUS
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO AUGMENTED
ORCHESTRA
(Leader, FRANK CANTELL)
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS
WALTER GLYNNE (Tenor)

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis
Tenor: Walter Glynne

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL News BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

TEDDY BROWN and his BAND, from CIRO's CLUB








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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