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: A MILITARY BAND PROGRAMME

(From Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM MILITARY BAND
Conducted by W. A. CLARKE

Contributors

Conducted By: W. A. Clarke

: JACK PAYNE and the B.B.C. DANCE

ORCHESTRA
MARIA MAROVA
Russian Folk Songs

: The Children's Hour :

' Who's been sitting in my nest 1 ' by MARGARET
MADELEY
Bird Songs by EMILIE WALDRON (Soprano)
1 Traditional Sayings and Superstitions-A Roland for an Oliver,' by WILLIAM HUGHES Songs by ALFRED BUTLER (Baritone)

Contributors

Songs By: Emilie Waldron
Songs By: Superstitions-A Roland
Unknown: William Hughes
Songs By: Alfred Butler

: Light Music

(From Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Conducted by FRANK CANTELL

Contributors

Conducted By: Frank Cantell

: Concert by the Harold Brooke Choir

Relayed from Bishopsgate Institute
ODETTE DE Foras (Soprano)
HARRY IDLE (Principal Violin)
GILBERT BARTON (Solo Flute)
The National Anthem
ARTHUR BLISS' position among present-day composers is now so firmly established that a new work from him is an event of some importance. This has the further interest of having been composed specially for the Harold Brooke Choir, which is now singing it for the first time. The work is dedicated to Sir Edward Elgar.
There is a short orchestral introduction, beginning dreamily, and leading to the vigorous mood of the first number, 'The Shepherd's Holyday,' to a poem of Ben Jonson's. It is followed by 'A Hymn to Pan' whose words are by John Fletcher. The voices sing this with great vigour and energy until, at the very end, they breathe the name of Pan himself softly as if in a hush of awe. And, as though the god himself heard them and answered, there is a little tune like his own piping. It leads into 'Pan's Saraband,' an innocent little Pastoral movement.
The next number is 'Pan and Echo, whose words are by Poliziano, translated by E. Geoffrey Dunlop. Tenor and bass in turn sing Pan's message, joining emphatically towards the end, while women's voices are the echo, changing the words with pathetic effect. It is rounded off by a brief return of Pan's Saraband. 'The Naiads' Music' with words by Robert Nichols, is a delicate piece mainly for women's voices, the men breaking in as fauns here and there.
The next number is the one solo part in the Pastoral. Its text also is by Robert Nichols — 'The Pigeon Song.' It is a duet for flute and mezzo-soprano voice, the two combining, along with a capricious, and intriguing accompaniment.
'The Song of the Reapers,' to Andrew Lang's translation of Theocritus, is a bold, vigorous hymn to Demeter.
The last movement begins with a solemn orchestral Prelude to a text from Fletcher which is not sung, invoking bright Hesperus and the Night. It leads into 'The Shepherd's Night Song,' whose words are again by Robert Nichols.

Contributors

Soprano: Odette de Foras
Soprano: Harry Idle
Violin: Gilbert Barton
Unknown: Rthur Bliss
Unknown: Sir Edward Elgar.
Unknown: Ben Jonson
Unknown: John Fletcher.
Translated By: E. Geoffrey
Unknown: Robert Nichols
Unknown: Andrew Lang
Unknown: Robert Nichols.

: A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON 0' DONNELL

Contributors

Conducted By: B. Walton 0' Donnell








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