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Listings

: ORGAN RECITAL

by R. J. MADDERN WILLIAMS ,
(Musical Director and Organist to the Norwich
Corporation)
Relayed from St. Mary-le-Bow DOROTHY ORD-BELL (Soprano)

Contributors

Unknown: R. J. Maddern Williams

: Jack PAYNE and THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

RONALD F R A N K A U
(Entertainer)
DOROTHY McBLAIN (The Girl who Whistles in her Throat)

Contributors

Unknown: Dorothy McBlain

: The Children's Hour:

(From Birmingham)
The Wood Fajry and the Dressing Table,' by Cecely Fleming
Songs by GERTRUDE DAvits (Soprano)
Moby Dick and How he Likes Life,' being a Story of a Whale by Mary Haras
Tony will Entertain

Contributors

Unknown: Wood Fajry
Songs By: Gertrude Davits
Soprano: Moby Dick
Unknown: Mary Haras

: Light Music

(From Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Conducted by FRANK CANTELL

Contributors

Conducted By: Frank Cantell

: 'Die Walkure'

ACT II
Relayed from the Royal Opera House,
Covent Garden
IN the old Norse mythology from which Wagner took the long and involved story of his
Nibelung's Ring, Wotan, the father of the gods, takes the place which the old Greeks assigned to Zeus, and his spouse Fricka is looked to as the guardian of the hearth and home and upholder of the domestic virtues.
The race of Walsungs, Siegmund and Sieglinde,
Wotan's children by an earthly alliance, is thus hateful to her, and in a long duet with Wotan she insists that in the coming fight with Hunding,
Siegmund must have no protection fiom the gods. Wotan would fain shield his son, and trits to make it clear to the wrathful Fricka that through the Walsungs alone can the race of gods be protected ; but Fricka is adamant, and in the end
Wotan must give way. Before that, however, Wotan has met his favourite warrior maiden Briinnhilde and told her to protect Siegmund in the fight. The whole of the music of this first part of the scene is stormy and vivid, like the wild mountain height on which the Valkyr maidens have their home. Then, at the end of the duet with Fricka, Wotan, dejected and forlorn, tells Brünnhilde that now it is Hunding she must shelter and that Sieg. mund must die. He leaves her, and Siegmund and Sieglinde approach-Sieglinde wearied with her long flight from Hunding. She falls fainting, and then there is an impressive moment when Briinnhilde appears to Siegmund and he asks her of his fate and Sieglinde's. Touched by his heroism and the love of the two, Brünnhilde decides to disobey Wotan and to fight for Siegmund.
Hunting's horn is heard, and through the darkness of storm clouds which roll down over the mountain, he and Siegmund meet and do battle, Briinnhilde protecting the Walsung. Wotan appears suddenly, in a glow of light, and holds his spear in front of Hunding's breast as Siegmund is about to slay his enemy. The sword breaks in two, and Hunding stabs the defenceless Siegmund with his spear. Briinnhilde catches up Sieglinde, and, seizing the broken pieces of the sword, flings herself upon her horse and rides away from the wrath of Wotan towards her own rocky fastness.

: A Popular Orchestral Concert

(From Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Conducted by FRANK CANTELL

Contributors

Conducted By: Frank Cantell








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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