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Listings

: An Orchestral Concert

(From Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Conducted by FRANK CANTELL

Contributors

Conducted By: Frank Cantell

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

(From Birmingham )
' Peas and Queues,' by Norman Timmis
Songs by HAROLD CASEY (Baritone)
Selections by The MIDLAND PIANOFORTE SEXTET

Contributors

Songs By: Harold Casey

: WEATHER FORE

CAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS Bulletin

: JACK PAYNE and THE B.B.C. DANCE

ORCHESTRA
WALTER TODD (Comedian)
JEAN MELVILLE (Songs at tho Piano)

: The Liverpool Philharmonic Society's Concert

From the Philharmonic Hall
S.B. from Liverpool
THE LIVERPOOL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA
Conducted by PIERRE MONTEUX
THE name of the Suite, ' Eine Kleine Nachtmusikis very nearly a literal translation into German of tho French ' Serenade.' The latter meant originally a piece of evening music, while this is ' A Little Night Music.'
Composed, so far as we know, for some specially happy occasion, shortly after the tremendous success which Figaro achieved in Prague, the Suite, like a string quartet, is in the usual four movements. The first, a brisk Allegro, is in the traditional form, with two main themes which form the basis of a development section and which are repeated in the last part of the movement. Next comes a slow movement, very much in the usual song-like mould. The principal tune begins at the outset with the same note repeated three times.
The third movement is a quite simple Minuet and the Suite comes to an end with a cheerful Rondo. The principal tune has a real suggestion of mischief in it. mHE Symphony No. 4 in D Minor belongs to the happiest time of Schumann's career.
It has a special interest in its form.
Schumann intended it as the logical conclusion of the tendency to weld the series of subjects in a Symphony into one whole, and the four movements follow one another without abreak. The themes of the introduction form the basis of the Romance, and the busy impetuous figure heard so much in the first movement plays an equally important part in the last. His first idea was to call it a Symphonic Fantasia, and though it is a real Symphony, the name may help to a better understanding of its composer's intention. Tho introduction, already referred to, is almost heavy-hearted in character; the real first movement has the usual two main tunes, both happy and instinct with fresh good spirits. The Romance which follows as slow movement, is a beautiful violin solo, and the third movement is in the conventional Scherzo and Trio form. The last movement begins with an almost bashful suggestion of the bustling theme from the first movement, and only after a little hesitation does the movement proceed on its way.

Contributors

Conducted By: Pierre Monteux

: Chamber Music

THE VIENNA STRING QUARTET
RUDOLF KOLISCH (Violin), FELIX KHUNER (Violin), EUGEN LEHNER (Viola), BENAR HEIFETZ
(Violoncello)

Contributors

Violin: Felix Khuner
Violin: Eugen Lehner
Viola: Benar Heifetz








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