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: A MILITARY BAND PROGRAMME

(From Birmingham)
THE CITY OF BIRMINGHAM POLICE BAND :
Conducted by RICHARD WASSELL

Contributors

Conducted By: Richard Wassell

: a Religious service

From the Birmingham Studio
Conducted by Canon S. BLOFELD , of St.
Bartholomew's Church, Edgbaston
Order of Service :
Hymn, ' 0 Thou Who dost accord us ' (English
Hymnal, No. 86)
Prayers
Magnificat
Hymn, ' My God, accept my heart this day'
(English Hymnal, No. 341)
Reading
Hymn, 'My God, I lovo Thee; not bocauso '
(English Hymnal, No. 80)
Address
Hymn, ' All ye who seek a comfort sure'
(English Hymnal, No. 71)
Benediction

Contributors

Conducted By: Canon S. Blofeld

: THE WEEK'S GOOD CAUSE:

(From Birmingham)
An Appeal on behalf of the Dudley Hospital Sunday Fund by Mr. D. TANFIELD (Secretary) (Donations to be forwarded to [address removed])

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. D. Tanfield

: A Choral Concert

(Frmn Birmingham)
The BIRMINGHAM STUDIO AUGMENTED
ORCHESTRA:
(Leader, FRANK CANTELL)
Conducted by Joseph LEWIS
ASTRA DESMOND (Contralto)
The BIRMINGHAM STUDIO CHORUS
THESchicksalsliod,' to givo 'Tho Song of Destiny' its original name, is based on a poem by Holderlin, one whoso last years were clouded by unhappiness which bordered on in. sanity ; noble and dignified in its way, the poem is pessimistic in outlook. It sets forth a contrast between tho happy state of the immortals and the trials and sufferings of mankind, and it ends on a rather hopeloss note. There is a quite short orchestral prelude, fore - shadowing the peace and glad. ness of the opening section of the poem. The chorus enters in the same happy vein, calm and serene, and that continues until tho conflicts of our earthly life intrude, breaking in on tho serene mood of the opening with vigorous rhythmic interruptions until the chorus concludes with man's passing away from earth. Then Brahms has an orchestral epilogue in which the themes of the opening are heard again, reminding us of its mood of bright serenity.
THE Rhapsody for Contralto, Male Voice
Choir and orchestra, is founded on a poem of Goethe's descriptive of a journey to the Harz mountains.
In the first two portions of the poem which Brahms has chosen, loneliness is the key-note, the sad state of those who livo apart from comradeship, taking no share in mankind's tasks. The last part of the work is in happier spirit, finding consolation in a divine thought finely expressed ; it concludes with a prayer to the ' Father of Love' to open the selfish eyes of the lonely one to all the boauty about him.
THE text of ' Blest Pair of Sirens' is Milton's
T poem, At a solemn Musick.' Known to practically every serious choral society throughout the country as one of the late Sir Hubert Parry 's finest and most dignified works, it is dedicated to Sir Charles Stanford and the Bach Choir, who gave it its first performance in 1887. There is a big impressive introduction for the orchestra, in which there can be heard many of the themes which accompany the voices throughout the choral part of tho work. The voices are in eight parts.

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis
Conducted By: Astra Desmond
Unknown: Sir Hubert Parry
Unknown: Sir Charles Stanford








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