• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: A Symphony Concert

Relayed from the Winter Gardens, Bournemouth
No. VIII of the Thirty-fourth Winter Series
THE BOURNEMOUTH MUNICIPAL AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Sir DAN GODFREY
CYRIL TOWBIN (Violin)
THE third 'Leonore' Overture has long established itself as first favourite among the four, and there are grounds for believing that Beethoven himself would have agreed with this verdict. It begins with a solemn descending scale, and then we hear the beautiful air which in the opera, Florestan, the hero, sings of the happy springtime of his own youth. This tune is presented with some variants, and the whole of the introductory slow section is devoted to Florestan. Leonore appears with the beginning of the quick section, in a very beautiful tune eloquent of noble strength and dignity. A little later another impressive tune reminds us once more of Florestan and his unhappy lot in prison. After these have foreshadowed the action of the story, there is a dramatic moment when the whole orchestra falls silent and a trumpet call is heard from without. In the opera, the same trumpet call announces the arrival of the Governor, through whose coming Florestan. is released from his unjust imprisonment. A quiet tune on the woodwinds expresses the dawning of hope in the prisoner's heart, the trumpet call is heard again, and the theme of hope grows stronger. All the former tunes return, lending the music a note of exaltation, and the Overture ends with a great song of joy in which the first Leonoro tune rings out triumphantly.
THE first Movement of the Concerto begins with four drum beats, and then the oboe, clarinet, and bassoon play the principal theme. In the same way the second subject, when it appears, is heralded by four drum taps, this time on the dominant instead of on the tonic as at first.
After the orchestra has played both first and second subjects, the soloist has his first innings, playing both, not only in their simple form, but with elaborations.
The slow Movement is in the nature of a romance, in which the orchestra has for the most part the themes, two in number, while the soloist weaves embroideries about them. The Movement is short, and at the end there is a cadenza leading straight into the joyous Rondo.

Contributors

Conducted By: Sir Dan Godfrey
Violin: Cyril Towbin

: THE CHILDREN'S HouR:

(From Birmingham)
' On the Fairy Train,' by Winifred Ratcliff
SIDNEY HULL (Banjo)
Songs by MARJORIE PALMER (Soprano)

Contributors

Unknown: Winifred Ratcliff
Unknown: Sidney Hull
Songs By: Marjorie Palmer

: Vaudeville

IDA CRISPI
(The famous Revue Star)
ERNEST RUTHERFORD
(Concertina and Saxophone Solos) .
LEONARD HENRY
(Comedian)
WISH WYNNE (Character
Studies)
JACK PAYNE and THE
B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

Contributors

Unknown: Jack Payne

: Sing, Listeners, Sing ! \

(From Birmingham)
Another Programme of Old Favourite Chrus
Songs by THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO CHORUS
Assisted by the ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis

: The Midland Pianoforte Sextet

Leader, FRANK CANTELL
1 (From Birmingham)








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel