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Listings

: An Orchestral Concert

(From Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Conducted by FRANK CANTELL

Contributors

Conducted By: Frank Cantell

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR :

(From Birmingltam)
DAISY SHORROCKS (Violin)
Songs by DALE SMITH (Baritone)
WORTLEY ALLEN in Character Sketches

Contributors

Songs By: Dale Smith
Baritone: Wortley Allen

: A Symphony Concert

(From Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO AUGMENTED
ORCHESTRA
(Leader, FRANK CANTELL)
Conducted by JOSEPH Lewis
THIS was the work with which Elgar made his first appearance at one of the great English Festivals-at Worcester, in 1890. It thus did a good deal to spread his fame, and was probably the first of his larger works to arouse anything at all like the interest which was even then his due. In front of the score stands a quotation from Keats :—
'... when Chivalry
Lifted up her lanco on high ' ; and Mr. Newman tells us that the Overture took shape in its composer's mind from that passage in Walter Scott 's ' Old Mortality,' where Claverhouse speaks to Morton of his enthusiasm for the Froissart ' ' Chronicles. ' The music is indeed eloquent of Elgar's ideaized view of the old-world chivalry which Froissart presents to us with so much romance.
THE composer tells us himself that he cannot
JL remember whether it was he who gave this Symphony its title. It appeared two years after he had spent a specially happy holiday in Wales, and Sir Frederic says, ' it had a certain amount of Ueltic flavour about it, and I expect its composition was not unconnected with the recollections of my rambles, my broken-down old piano, the hymn - singing, and the honeymoonors of two years before.'
There are the traditional four movements, almost in the strict classical form.

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis
Unknown: Walter Scott

: READING

Prof. P. J. NOEL BAKER, reading from Gallions
Reach, by H. M. Tomlinson
FOR some years Mr. H. M. Tomlinson has been recognized as being not merely a brilliant journalist, but a writer of the most distinguished prose. ' Gallions Reach,' from which Professor Bakor will read tonight, was his first novel, and it excited the liveliest interest in literary circles when it appeared last year. The shipwreck passage that will be broadcast affords a particularly interesting comparison with Conrad's books.

Contributors

Unknown: P. J. Noel
Unknown: H. M. Tomlinson

: 'The Invention of Dr. Metzler'

A Play by JOHN POLLOCK
(From Birmingham)
An April evening in the year 1849.
Rosa von West , an Austrian, is working at a piece of embroidery by the light of a reading lamp in the salon of a country house near a fortified town besieged by the Austrians. Intermittent cannon fire comes dully from the distance.
This will be preceded by ' THE LAST TOKEN,' by W. A. EATON
Spoken by GLADYS WARD
Incidental Music by the MIDLAND PIANOFORTE Trio

Contributors

Play By: John Pollock
Unknown: Rosa Von West
Unknown: W. A. Eaton
Spoken By: Gladys Ward
Dr Metzler: James Prodger
Hungarian Officer: Henry Butlin
Austrian Officer: Alfred Butler
Rosa von West: Jane Ellis
Fanny: Doris Burton








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