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Listings

: A Children's Concert

Relayed from the Town Hall, Birmingham
THE CITY OF BIRMINGHAM ORCHESTRA
Conducted by ADRIAN BOULT

Contributors

Conducted By: Adrian Boult

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR :

(From Birmingham)
' Snooky visits the Fair,' by Phyllis Richardson AUNTIE RUBY, UNCLE LAURIE and HORACE of Nottingham will Entertain
J. B. PHILLIPS (Farmyard and Bird Imitations)

Contributors

Unknown: Phyllis Richardson
Unknown: J. B. Phillips

: Light Music

HARDY WILLIAMSON (Tenor) JESSIE CORMACK (Pianoforte)
THE HENRY SENSICLE QUINTET

Contributors

Pianoforte: Jessie CormacK

: Vaudeville

(From Birmingham)
ELSIE and DORIS WATERS (Entertainers at the Piano)
J. B. PHILLIPS (Siffleur and Mimic)
DORIS ROLAND and GILBERT MAURICE
(Comedy Duo)
GEORGE BUCK (In Light Songs)
Joseph BULL (Banjo)
PHILLIP BROWN 'S 'SHAKESPEAREANS' DANCE-
BAND

Contributors

Unknown: Doris Roland
Unknown: Gilbert Maurice
Unknown: Phillip Brown

: A Symphony Concert

(From Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO AUGMENTED
ORCHESTRA
(Leader, FRANK CANTELL)
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS 10.0 WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL News BULLETIN 10.15 Sports Bulletin (From Birmingham)
THIS Symphony was produced at the Crystal
Palace in 1866. In the following year it achieved what was then the proudest distinction which could be offered to a new work ; it was played at the Gewandhaus concerts in Leipzig, then recognized as the most important symphony concerts in the world.
The Symphony is in the usual four movements, and all are in the traditional forms. A distinctly Irish flavour can bo discerned in the themes themselves, and the Symphony has always been known as ' The Irish.' The first movement begins with a short, fairly slow section in which hints of all the main tunes of the following quick movement can be heard. It is worked out at considerable length, but is throughout so clear and so frankly melodious as to need no detailed analysis.
The second is an expressive slow movement in which the melody is chiefly in the hands of the wind instruments.
The third is the one movement which shows a slight departure from tradition. Taking the place of the usual Scherzo, it has a contrasting middle, section which might stand as the ' Trio, but the return of the opening after that is in a much shorter and simpler design than when we hear it first. It begins with a capricious little tune for the Oboe.
The last movement is the most energetic and vigorous, and though part of the first main tune makes its appearance from time to time in quieter mood, it never loses its sense of bustling gaiety.

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis








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