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Listings

: VARIETY

(From Birmingham)
JAMES DONOVAN
(Saxophone)
Mavis BENNETT (Soprano) in 'Bird Songs'
THORNLEY DODGE
(Entertainer)
'WILL IT COME To
This 1 '
(A Domestic Episode of the future by MONA
PEARCE)

Contributors

Unknown: Mavis Bennett
Freddy: Trevor Cash
Margaret, his wife: Molly Hall
Elizabeth, a prospective maid: Gladys Joiner

: The Dansant

(From Birmingham)
BILLIE FRANCIS and his BAND
Relayed from the West End Dance Hall
BEATRICE DE HOLTHOIR (Diseuse)

Contributors

Unknown: Billie Francis

: The CHILDREN'S HOUR:

(From Birmingham) .
' Snooky receives an S.O.S.,' by Phyllis Richardson
JAMES DONOVAN and his Saxophone
THORNLEY DODGE will entertain

Contributors

Unknown: Phyllis Richardson
Unknown: James Donovan
Unknown: Thornley Dodge

: Light Music

(From Birmingham)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Conducted by FRANK CANTELL

Contributors

Conducted By: Frank Cantell

: B.B.C. PROMENADE CONCERT

SIR HENRY WOOD and His SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
ELSIE BLACK (Contralto)
FRANK TITTERTON (Tenor)
LEFF POUISHNOFF (Pianoforte)
Relayed from the Queen's Hall, London (Conducted by the COMPOSER)
BEETHOVEN'S Fidelio had several vicissitudes of fortune before it became a success, and for each new production he wrote a fresh
Overture. One of these exists in two different forms, so we may count Fidelio's Overtures as actually five.
The so-called Third
Overture (actually the second in order of composition) begins with a short, slow Introduction, and then the vigorous main body of the Overture begins. There are two chief tunes-the very soft and mysteriously-opening one, and a succeeding smoothly - flowing one.
Note the dramatically i nterrupti ng Trumpet call in the middle of the Overture (generally performed, in the concert-room, by a player out of sight behind the Orchestra) ; this represents the crucial moment in the play, when the Minister of State appears-just in time to save the hero from execution.
THIS, one of the less frequently heard Concertos of Saint-Saëns, came out in 1875, when the composer himself (aged forty) played the pianoforte part.
The first two Movements, a quick one and a slow one, are linked together the slow portion starting with a tune for Woodwind, accompanied by pianoforte arpeggios.
The next Movement is quick and lively-a Scherzo. It contains reminiscences of tunes heard near the opening of the work. Another slow section (following without pause) brings back a tune by now familiar, from the earlier slow section, and then comes the final quick portion,
THIS piece, celebrating the salvation of Russia from Napoleon, was written for the consecration of a church in Moscow which had been erected in thanksgiving for that event, and was to be performed in the open air by a huge military band, with cannon firing-all very grandiose ! That performance, however, never took place.
Tchaikovsky himself afterwards described it in his diary as ' an indifferent sort of work, possessing merely a patriotic and local significance.'

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Henry Wood








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

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This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

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