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: VARIETY

(From Birmitighdm)
THE BIRMINGHAM
STUDIO CHORUS
Conducted by Joseph LEWIS
MINA TAYLOR in a Character Sketch CYRIL LIDINGTON
(Light Songs)
NORMAN HaCKFORTH (Pianoforte) in a selection of his owrf
Compositions
MELSA (Violin)

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis
Conducted By: Mina Taylor

: Thé Dansant

(From Birmingham)
BILLY FRANCIS and his BAND
Relayed from the West End Dance Hall EDITH JAMES (Entertainer at the Piano)

Contributors

Unknown: Billy Francis

: A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

(From Birmingham)
Relayed from the Bandstand, Cannon Hill Park
THE City OF BIRMINGHAM POLICE BAND
Conducted by RICHARD WASSELL

Contributors

Conducted By: Richard Wassell

: B.B.C. PROMENADE CONCERT

Relayed from the Queen's Hall, London
Sir HENRY WOOD and his SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
DORA LABBETTE (Soprano)
HAROLD Williams (Baritone)
BEATRICE HARRISON (Violoncello)
Solo Horns : AUBREY BRAIN , M. GRAYDON ,
F. W. SALKELD , G. W. SMITH
AUBREY BRAIN , M. GRAYDON ,
F. W. SALKELD , G. W. SMITH and Orchestra
THE Concerto was long a display piece for the soloist : sometimes it was simply and solely that, sometimes the display was subordinate to the music. No Concerto, however, before this of Elgar, had so much of reflection and mysticism in its composition. Its spirit has some affinity with that of The Dream of Geronlius.
The Concerto is in four Movements, but there is no break between the first two, and the third ends inconclusively, thus leading to the Finale.
In the First Movement the solo Violoncello's opening recitative-like phrase should be noted, for it becomes a sort of ' text' for the whole work.
The SECOND MOVEMENT opens with a Recitative, similar to the phrase at the opening of the First Movement, but out of it the soloist gradually evolves the chief tune of that Movement, which is characterized by rapid repeated notes.
Almost the whole of this Movement is of this rapid, agitated character, which contrasts with the pastoral feeling of the First Movement.
The THIRD MOVEMENT (Slow) is very short, and is practically a continuous song for the Solo Violoncello, with Muted Strings (and occasionally chords on Clarinets, Bassoons, and Horns). As has been already mentioned, the inconclusive ending of this Movement leads into-
The FOURTH MOVEMENT. The Recitative which opened the First and Second Movements is now expanded further still, and ends in an elaborate Cadenza for the Solo Violoncello.
This instrument then (accompanied by Strings in detached notes) enters upon the main tune of the Movement, which consists of the ' text' transformed into a dance.
There are a few other contrasting tunes, but this one, being, as it were, the apotheosis of the ' text tune of the work, dominates the music until, at the end, the Solo Violoncello gives out the ' text' emphatically in its first form.
Then the dance is taken up again, but quickly comes to an end.

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Henry Wood
Soprano: Dora Labbette
Baritone: Harold Williams
Baritone: Beatrice Harrison
Horns: Aubrey Brain
Horns: M. Graydon
Unknown: F. W. Salkeld
Unknown: G. W. Smith
Unknown: Aubrey Brain
Unknown: M. Graydon
Unknown: F. W. Salkeld
Unknown: G. W. Smith

: PROMENADE CONCERT

(Continued)
DORA LABBETTE
Selected Songs
HAROLD Williams
Selection from his Repertoire

Contributors

Unknown: Dora Labbette
Unknown: Harold Williams








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