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: A MILITARY BAND PROGRAMME

From Birmingham
The BIRMINGHAM MILITARY BAND, conducted by W. A. CLARKE

Contributors

Conducted By: W. A. Clarke

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

(From Birmingham):
Christine Silver will tell a story. The Cleff Trio in Duets and Trios. 'The Combat,' a Story by Estelle Steel Harper

: THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

Personally conducted by JACK PAYNE

Contributors

Conducted By: Jack Payne

: A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND, conducted by JOHN ANSELL
OLIVE STURGESS (Soprano)
HERBERT PARKER (Baritone)
DVORAK'S Carnival is the second of three
Overtures which the Composer originally planned as Symphonic Movements, to illustrate three phases of life-Childhood, Youth and Manhood (or, as another interpretation of the scheme has it, Nature, Life and Love).
We may regard Carnival as a picture of lusty youth, rejoicing in the exciting fullness of life. The dashing style of the opening work conveys that idea vividly, In the middle is a happily contrasted slow section.
A BALLET used to be indispensable in an Opera, and Gounod, a master at writing such light and joyous music, duly brought in some dances in Romeo and Juliet—in Capulet's garden, at Verona. Amongst a gay throng move pedlars selling jewellery. Hence a Jewel Dance. Country folk come in, bringing posies, and a Flower Waltz follows. A countryman and his girl next execute the Dance of the Fiancie : An Invitation. Next follows the Dance of the Young Veiled Girl. The final fling is a Gipsy Dance.

Contributors

Conducted By: John Ansell
Soprano: Olive Sturgess
Baritone: Herbert Parker

: 'THE DARK CURTAIN'

From Birmingham
A Play in One Act with a Prologue and an Epilogue, by EVELYN HERBERT
Foreword: Mystery surrounds the death of Amy Robsart , wife of the Earl of Leicester, the brilliant favourite of Queen' Elizabeth. It is thought that, prompted by ambitious hopes of an alliance with the Queen, he and a servant, Varney, conspired against Amy's life. In 1560 she was found dead in Cumnor Hall, near Oxford, and though no direct evidence could be proved against him, it was the common opinion that Leicester had murdered his wife by means of a trap-door placed for her destruction. Amy's death, however, brought Leicester and his fellow conspirator nothing but misery, and from that time onwards misfortune followed him, and in 1588 he himself met his death by poison.
Characters in Prologue and Epilogue :
Characters in Play :
The action of the play takes place in two different centuries-the twentieth and sixteenth. The Prologue and Epilogue are representative of the twentieth century, while the play is in the sixteenth century. The scene all through is laid in a sparsely-furnished room in Cumnor Hall. A table and a few chairs comprise the contents of the room. A thick black curtain divides the room from an outer hall.

Contributors

Unknown: Evelyn Herbert
Unknown: Amy Robsart
Mrs Varney: F A Chamberlain
Sybil Leigh: Molly Hall
Geoffrey Denham: Stuart Vinden
Robert Dudley: Stuart Vinden
Amy Robsart: Gladys Ward
Varney: Wortley Allen








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