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Listings

: A DINNER HOUR SERVICE

From Birmingham
Relayed from ST. MARTIN'S PARISH CHURCH
Speaker, Dr. PEAKE

Contributors

Unknown: Dr. Peake

: A SYMPHONY CONCERT

Relayed from the Winter Gardens, Bournemouth
(No. 25 of the Thirty-third Winter Series)
The BOURNEMOUTH MUNICIPAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (50 Performers)
Conducted by Sir DAN GODFREY

The Procession to the Rocio - Turina Triana in Festival Mood ; The Procession (First Performance at these Concerts)
Overture to ' Melusina' - Mendelssohn
'Cello Concerto - Haydn (1) Moderately quick ; (2) Slow ; (3) Quick (Soloist, L. MANNUCCI)
Symphony, ' Roineo and Juliet' - Berlioz Festivities in Capulct's Palace; Love Scone; Queen Mab, or the Queen of Dreams—Scherzo

Contributors

Conducted By: Sir Dan Godfrey

: AN AFTERNOON CONCERT

From Birmingham
Relayed from Lozells Picture House
The ORCHESTRA, conducted by PAUL RIMMER

Contributors

Conducted By: Paul Rimmer

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

(From Birmingham) :
' The Mystery Coin,' by Hilda Rcdway. May Hall (Soprano) in Nursery Rhymes set to music by Mary Ferrers. The Fairy Godmother's Adventure. Jacko and a Piano

: DANCE MUSIC

THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA
Personally conducted by JACK PAYNE

Contributors

Conducted By: Jack Payne

: HALLE ORCHESTRA PENSION FUND CONCERT

Relayed from the Free Trade Hall, Manchester
THE HALLÉ ORCHESTRA
Conducted by SIR HAMILTON HARTY
THE Symphony in C Minor follows the usual classical forms, and is in four Movements.
The First is very weighty and unusually serious, even for Brahms. The vein of seriousness affects also the Second Movement, a gently-flowing piece, partly song-like, partly rhapsodic. Then comes a more light-spirited Movement, of a more seizable rhythm, but one that is far from introducing the spirit of gaiety that we often find in one of the centrepieces of a Symphony.
The last Movement opens with a short, solemn
Introduction that keeps the Violins in soaring flight for a few bars. Then after a change from the prevailing minor to a major key and a short pause, the urgent Finale (still in the major) starts on its long, exulting course....

Contributors

Conducted By: Sir Hamilton Harty

: In the Manchester Studio

DOROTHY BENNETT (Soprano)

Contributors

Soprano: Dorothy Bennett

: CONCERT

(Continued)
A STRAIN of melancholy, amounting to morbidity, shows itself in Tchaikovsky. The
Fourth Symphony and the Sixth (' Pathetic ') both contain evidence of it, and so, to a smaller extent, does this Fifth Symphony.
A ' Motto ' Theme of sombre character, which opens the work, is heard in each of the Movements, though, towards the end, in a much brighter, even triumphant mood.
The FIRST MOVEMENT begins with a soft introduction, containing the ' Motto,' and then goes on a spirited course, its Second Main Tune (Strings) providing relief, in its gentler suggestion -almost that of pleading, one might say.
The SECOND MOVEMENT is mostly quiet and plaintive, It has three Main Tunes. heard respectively on Horn. Strings, and Clarinet. The
' Motto ' Theme then intrudes, giving way quickly to a review of the Main Tunes, the Movement. ending peacefully.
The THIRD MOVEMENT is one of Tchaikovsky's many charming Valses, in writing which he could display all his enchanting skill in orchestration. The ' Motto ' casts a momentary gloom on the proceedings, near the end.
In the Introduction to the LAST MOVEMENT the haunting theme has become bold and cheerful, having been put in a major key. Its last appearance is in the final bars of the Symphony, where it dominates the music regally.








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