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: A SYMPHONY CONCERT

BEATRICE HARRISON (Violoncello)
THE WIRELESS Symphony ORCHESTRA (Leader, S. KNEALE KELLEY ). Conducted by HERMANN SCHERCHEN Trumpet in F, HERBERT BARR ; Violin, S. KNEALE KELLEY; Flute, FRANK ALMGILL ; Oboe, JOHN FIELD
4.0 BEATRICE HARRISON and Orchestra
DELIUS' Concertos for Pianoforte, Violin, and 'Cello are very different works from the older Concertos, that involved a good deal of display by the soloist. He condenses his thoughts into one Movement, which contains sections roughly corresponding to the three Movements of the older Concerto form, yet sometimes, as in this work, more unified in mood.
The spirit of meditative beauty informs this Concerto, beauty that is leisurely given out. Its fresh, cool charm of melody and richness of harmony are restful and refreshing. The Concerto was published in 1921, and Miss Harrison was the first to perform it - at Vienna.
PAUL HINDEMITH (born 1895) began as a Violin and Viola player, and now plays the Viola in the Amar Quartet. He led the orchestra in the Opera House at Frankfort, and from 1915 to 1923 conducted there.
A ' Concerto for Orchestra,' without the usual soloist, takes us back to the days of the ' Concerto Grosso,' in which a small body of players in the orchestra took one side, as it were, and the rest of the orchestra took the other, each side in turn having portions to play.
In this work, which was first heard at a Promenade Concert in 1926, Hindemith treats the idea of the solo group more freely than the older composers. His solo group at the start is a Violin, Oboe and Bassoon.
In the FIRST MOVEMENT he weaves strands of tone together in a striking, dashing style.
The SECOND MOVEMENT, planned to go straight on without pause, is even livelier.
The THIRD MOVEMENT is a March for Woodwind only.
The LAST MOVEMENT, seven beats to a bar, repeats one motif in the bass all through, and builds some very free harmonies above it.
THE Seventh Symphony was first performed, in manuscript, at a charity concert in 1813, got up for the benefit of soldiers wounded in the war between the French and Austrians.
There are four Movements. FIRST MOVEMENT. This has a fine, rather long, slow Introduction, followed by the gay Movement proper.
SECOND MOVEMENT. The mood seems to alternate between sorrow, as expressed by the solemn, touching minor-key theme that opens the Movement, and consolation, as suggested by the theme in the major which succeeds it.
THIRD MOVEMENT. This is a brilliant Scherzo, with a capital contrast in its calm second section (the ' Trio ').
FOURTH MOVEMENT. The fun continues, with other qualities mingled, a rude boisterousness being one.

ORCHESTRA Overture, ' Aggrippina ' - Handel
Second Brandenburg Concerto in F - Bach
Violoncello Concerto - Delius
4.20 ORCHESTRA Concerto for Orchestra (Op. 38) - Hindemith
4.40 Seventh Symphony - Beethoven

Contributors

Unknown: Beatrice Harbison
Leader: S. Kneale Kelley
Unknown: Hermann Scherchen
Violin: F, Herbert Barr
Violin: S. Kneale Kelley;
Flute: Frank Almgill
Oboe: John Field
Oboe: Beatrice Harrison
Unknown: Paul Hindemith

: A LIGHT ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

From Birmingham
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO Orchestra
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis








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