• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: CHAMBER MUSIC

THE CATTERALL STRING QUARTET
ARTHUR CATTERALL (1st Violin) JOHN F. BRIDGE (2nd Violin)
FRANK S. PARK (Viola)
JOHAN C. HOCK (Violoncello) with J. BARRETT (2nd Viola)
ANNE THURSFIELD (Soprano)
FRANCESCO TICCIATI (Pianoforte)
THE QUARTET and J. BARRETT
1.10 FRANCESCO TICCIATI (Pianoforte)
Selected Items
4.20 THE QUARTET
Selected Item

Contributors

Violin: John F. Bridge
Viola: Johan C. Hock
Unknown: J. Barrett

: A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From the Birmingham Studio
Conducted by the Rev. F. C. SPURR , of Hamstead Road Baptist Church

Contributors

Unknown: Rev. F. C. Spurr

: THE WEEK'S GOOD CAUSE (From Birmingham) :

Appeal on behalf of the Birmingham Voluntary Hospitals Contributory Scheme, by Major FORD

: A MISCELLANEOUS CHORAL CONCERT

From Birmingham
THE BIRINGHAM STUDIO CHORUS and AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA (Leader, FRANK CANTELL)
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS
MURIEL BRUNSKILL (Contralto)
EDNA ILES (Pianoforte)
FOUR Overtures to one Opera is a generous allowance, Fidelio had several vicissitudes of fortune before it became a success, and for each new production the composer wrote a fresh overture. One of these exists in two different forms, so we may count Fidelio's overtures as actually five. Only one of them is called by the name of the work, the others being known by that of the heroine, Leonora.
The so-called Third Overture (actually the second in order of composition) was written for the revival of the Opera in the Spring of 1806, after its unsuccessful first production a few months earlier.
It begins with a short slow Introduction, and then the vigorous main body of the Overture begins. There are two chief tunes-the very soft and mysteriously-opening one, and a succeeding smoothly-flowing one.
Note the dramatically 'interrupting Trumpet-call in the middle of the Overture (generally performed, in the concert-room, by a player out of sight behind the Orchestra); this represents the crucial moment in the play, when the Minister of State appears-just in time to save the hero from execution.
THIS Te Deum, the last completed work of Sullivan, was written for the Thanksgiving Service in St. Paul's, in 1902, on the declaration of peace after the South African War. In its accompaniment Sullivan made use of the famous hymn-tune, St. Gertrude (sung to 'Onward, Christian Soldiers '), that he had written thirty years before.
THE words of the Rhapsody consist of some stanzas from a poem of Goethe, who wrote it as a result of his interest in a young man to whom life seemed a weariness. In the first two stanzas, the sad estate is contemplated of him who goes apart from men comfortless, unloved and unloving. Lonely, he becomes self-seeking, doing nothing to help the world onward.
Then. in the last portion of the poem, comes consolation. and here Brahms finely reflects and reinforces the cheering thoughts : ' But if from thy psaltery, 0' Father of Love, one note may come to his ear, refresh his soul ! Open his clouded eyes to see the thousand fountains that are near him in the desert !
GRANVILLE BANTOCK (a Londoner, bom
1868) has much vocal music to his credit-large-scale Choral works (some with Full Orchestra). Part-Songs and Folk-Song settings, and Solo Songs (some of these with Orchestra). He has also found much interest in Eastern subjects, and in past civilizations such as those of Egypt and , Greece.
- In the Hymn to Aphrodite (one of Three Songs of Sappho) a distressed lover craves the aid-of the immortal ' Daughter of Zeus.'

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis
Contralto: Muriel Brunskill
Unknown: Granville Bantock








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel