• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: A LIGHT ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

From Birmingham
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA, conducted by FRANK CANTELL

Contributors

Unknown: Frank Cantell

: THE DANSANT

HAROLD TURLEY and his BAND
Relayed from Wimbush's Prince's Cafe,
Birmingham

Contributors

Unknown: Harold Turley

: A BALLAD CONCERT

From Birmingham

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR (From Birmingham) :

Edith James , a Piano and some Songs. ' 'Country-under-the-Wave,' by Alan Griff. Walter Heard (Flute and Piccolo Solos)

Contributors

Unknown: Edith James
Unknown: Alan Griff.

: LIGHT MUSIC

FRANK IVIMEY 'S SEXTET
WINIFRED FISHER (Soprano) WILLIAM HESELTINE (Tenor)

Contributors

Unknown: Frank Ivimey
Soprano: Winifred Fisher
Tenor: William Heseltine

: DANCING TIME

THE LONDON RADIO DANCE BAND, directed by SIDNEY FIRMAN
VARIETY

Contributors

Directed By: Sidney Firman

: THEMES AND VARIATIONS

From Birmingham
This programme includes examples in several styles of this, the earliest phase of musical form.
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA, conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS
AMONG the almost innumerable smaller works of Mozart there are many gems of musical literature ' (as Tchaikovsky called them) which have never become well known. It was in order to bring some of this unknown Mozart before the public that Tchaikovsky wrote his Suite, Mozartiana. It consists of orchestral arrangements of threo Piano Pieces and of the little Choral work Ave verum Corpus. The set of Variations forms the last piece in the Suite.
THE tune which forms the basis of the whole piece falls into several sections, expressing feelings of tenderness, mysticism, and exaltation. The five variations, in which the Piano and Orchestra carry on a wonderful dialogue of comment upon this theme, are not of the clear-cut older variation style, but, as the word ' Symphonic ' implies, are fairly elaborate (though quite clear), dignified, and of considerable depth of emotional expression.
A powerful little phrase is thrown out by the Orchestra ; this Pianoforte answers with a quiet one. The two parties discuss the matter for a while, then the time changes to three-in-a-bar, and the Strings pluck out a portion of the Main Tune for the Variations. But the Pianoforte interferes, expounds its opening idea further, and brings in the Orchestra for still more discussion. (All this does not take long.) After a climax the Pianoforte gives out the tune for variation-a lovely calm melody. The Orchestra joins it, and afterwards come the Variations. Wo shall hear, besides several treatments of the chief tune, references to the Orchestra's opening challenge, and to the Pianoforte's reply to it-the latter theme being changed into a gay dance towards the end.
SIR EDWARD GERMAN uses the word SIR Diversions ' because, we are told, the Theme is treated more freely in some of them than in the old-style Variations.
The Theme (which is preceded by a forceful
Introduction) is slow and solemn. Sir Edward German comes from the Welsh border, and perhaps it is permissible to find a suggestion of Welsh hymn-tune in this Theme. The Six Diversions are in the following styles :-
(1) Fairly quick, dignified; (2) Very quick and playful ; (3) Quick and lively. A Gipsy Dance ; (4) Slowish, but with movement ; calmly. The Muted Strings are here divided into ten parts; (5) Quick, in waltz style ; (6) Slowish, with movement.

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel