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: AN ORGAN RECITAL

By G. THALBEX-BALL , F.R.C.O., Organist and Director of the Choir, The Templo Church
Relayed from St. Mary-le-Bow
Church

Contributors

Unknown: G. Thalbex-Ball

: G. THALBEN-BALL

THE Occasion' that produced the work whose Overture we are to hear was the defeat, in 1745, of the Young Pretender, after he had reached Derby and so threatened the capital. Handel decided to express the general joy in a choral work, first performed in February, 1746, which was known as the Occasional Oratorio.
The Prelude to this work, a typical large-scale Overture of the period, has four Movements :-
1. (Slow and stately.) There is only one persistent Tune, and that ia merely a one-bar idea. This leads, with no real feeling of break, into :—
II. (Quick.) This is in the nature of a Fugue, a Movement on one subject only—generally quite a brief phrase, as hero.
III. (Slow.) A brief, lyrical Movement, which practically constitutes an introduction to :--
IV. (A March.) This is the best-known part of the Overture. It is in two clearly defined halves, each of which is repeated.

: DANCE MUSIC

THE LONDON RADIO DANCE BAND, directed by SIDNEY FIRMAN
LANCELOT QUINN (Irish Ballads)
LITTLE ANNE ROGERS
(Impersonations and Light Comedy Songs)

Contributors

Directed By: Sidney Firman
Directed By: Lancelot Quinn
Unknown: Anne Rogers

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

(From Birmingham) :
' The Little Silk Queen of China,' by G. B. Hughes. Margaret Ablethorpo (Pianoforte). ' The Most Wonderful Engineering Achievement ' -a Competition Story by O. Bolton King. Songs by Isabel Tebbs (Soprano)

: LIGHT MUSIC

From Birmingham
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis

: FRANCES MORRIS

QUILTER'S music is a peculiarly happy summing-up of many of the graces of British art. It is fluent, fanciful and delicate, good-humoured and tuneful, fresh-airy and free-flowing.
These three English Dances are early work-his eleventh published composition. They were first heard at a Promenade Concert in 1910.

: VAUDEVILLE

From Birmingham
IVAN FIRTH and PHYLLIS SCOTT
(In Duets)
KEN KAPUA (and his Hawaiian Guitar) ELMS STURCESS-WELLS (Light Baritone)
ALBERT DANIELS (in Child Impressions)
JACK VENABLES and his BAND

Contributors

Unknown: Phyllis Scott
Unknown: Ken Kapua
Baritone: Albert Daniels
Unknown: Jack Venables

: 'NEED WE ENVY OUR GRANDCHILDREN ? '

A Debate between
Mr. DOUGLAS WOODRUFF and Mr. E. V. Knox
(' Evoe ' of Punch)
Chairman: Mrs. OLIVER STRACHEY
WILL our grandchildren be as much happier than ourselves as we imagine that we are happier than the Mid-Victorians ! Is our civilization destined to go on expanding in liberty (and licence) as it has done for the last generation or two ? Or will there be a reaction ? Or are we merely in a state of degeneration that time will only accentuate ? All these points will doubtless bo raised and met in the clash between two of the most, brilliant talkers who over faced a microphone when they meet tonight.

Contributors

Unknown: Douglas Woodruff
Unknown: Mr. E. V. Knox
Unknown: Mrs. Oliver Strachey








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