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: BRAHMS' REQUIEM

Conducted by ALBERT ORTON
Relayed from St. Anne's Church, Soho
BRAHMS here uses the title Requiem not for a setting of the Mass for the Dead, but as descriptive of a work consisting of seven Movements, each a setting of passages from the German Bible. It was written as a memorial to the composer's mother.
1. ‘Blessed are they that moum.'
2. ' Behold all flesh' is as the grass.' This has the character of a massive Funeral March. The middle part is an outburst of joyful anticipation.
3. 'Lord, make me to know the measure of my days.' The first part of this is a Baritone Solo.
4. ' How lovely is thy dwelling place.'
5. Ye now are sorrowful : howbeit ye shall again behold Me.' This movement, a delicate, ethereal Soprano Solo, was written after the rest of the Requiem had already had its first performance.
6. ' Here on earth we have no continuing place.' This is a dramatic movement, divided between the Baritone Soloist and the Chorus.
7. ' Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.' Brahms follows tradition in closing his Requiem with a subdued, serene movement.

Contributors

Conducted By: Albert Orton

: VARIETY

From Birmingham
ROBERT PITT and LANGTON MARKS (calling the British Smiles)
MILLIE CONSTANCE (Soubrette)
BEATRICE DE HOLTHOIR (Diseuse)
SANTA and BARBARA (the Spanish Duettists)
PHILIP BROWN ’S DOMINOES DANCE BAND

Contributors

Unknown: Philip Brown

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR : (From Birmingham)

' Bosie, the Bear Cub,' by Mildred Forster. Uncles Mutt and Jeff will entertain. ' The Palace of Silence.' by Alan Griff. Santa and Barbara in Spanish Duets

: LIGHT MUSIC

From Birmingham
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA, conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS
THE Overture brings the spirit of the Dance before us in many of its familiar forms, like the preamble to a Carnival ball. It is spirited music, written when Sullivan was twenty-eight, before he dreamt of winning fain; as a composer of Comic Operas.
WEBER'S piece has a 'programme.’ This is how the composer describes the music's story background : ' At a ball a gentleman approaches a lady and asks for the pleasure of a dance. At first she hesitates ; he presses ; she c6nsents. Now they converse more easily. He begins; she replies. Now for the dance ! They take their places and wait for it to begin. Then follows the dance. At its close the gentleman expresses his thanks, the lady bows, and " the rest is silence.'
MOZART wrote his -music for the Ballet Les Petits Riens (a fanciful affair about-three adventures of Cupid) when, at twenty-two, he was trying his fortune in Paris. He collaborated with Noverre, the great ballet master, and the pretty music of this slight work was the result. In all there were thirteen tiny pieces in it. The Ballet was produced in 1778, and after that the music was lost for nearly a hundred years. Then, in 1872, Victor Wilder , one of Mozart's biographers, found it in the Library of the Paris Opera.
7.30 JOHN ANDERSON
Beat o' the Drum.................... Simpson To Anthea ............................. Hatton Sigh no more, ladies..................... Keel There is an Island of Gardens Coleridge-Taylor
ORCHESTRA
Suite of Ballet Music from ' The Fountain ’
,'. Delibes

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis
Unknown: Victor Wilder
Unknown: John Anderson

: DANCING TIME

THE LONDON RADIO DANCE BAND, directed by SIDNEY FIRMAN
MUNRO and MILLS (Syncopation on two Pianos)
DICKIE DIXON (Syncopated Numbers)
DUDLEY ROLPH (Light Syncopated Numbers)

Contributors

Directed By: Sidney Firman
Unknown: Dudley Rolph

: CHAMBER MUSIC

LINDA SEYMOUR (Contralto)
CEDRIC SHARPE ('Cello)
CECIL DIXON (Pianoforte)

Contributors

Cello: Cedric Sharpe
Pianoforte: Cecil Dixon








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