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Listings

: LOZELLS PICTURE HOUSE ORGAN

Relayed from Lozells Picture
House. Birmingham
FRANK NEWMAN (Organ)
HILDA NIBB (Contralto)
From Birmingham

Contributors

Unknown: Frank Newman

: AN ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA, conducted by JOHN ANSELL
ERNEST AUTY (Tenor); MARIE WILSON (Violin)

Contributors

Conducted By: John Ansell
Conducted By: Ernest Auty
Tenor: Marie Wilson

: The Children's Hour

(From Birmingham) :
Songs by Norah Tarrant (Contralto). 'The Shepherd's Hut,' by Greta Costai. Margaret Ablethorpe (Pianoforte).

: The London Radio Dance Band

Directed by Sidney Firman
Leaven and Childs (Syncopated Duets)

Contributors

Unknown: Sidney Firman

: B.B.C. PROMENADE CONCERT

Relayed from the Queen's Hall, London
Sir HENRY J. WOOD and his SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
DORA LABBETTE (Soprano)
TUDOR DAVIES (Tenor)
MARGARET FAIRLESS (Violin)
HAYDN was fond of -London, and twice came over to conduct some of his works—and incidentally to be feted and have a thoroughly good time.
This Symphony. Haydn's hundred-and-fourth, was first heard in 1795. when he (then aged sixty-three) had a benefit concert. In style and power the music looks forward to Beethoven.
The First Movement opens with a slow Introduction, which, very effectively, is in the minor key, the quick main body of the Movement being in the major. Its First Main Tune is a natty, lively one. which Haydn apparently liked so well that he used it as the Second Main Tune also-quite an unusual thing to do. There is a brief new tune, but it can scarcely be called a main one.
The Second Movement, the slow one, is an Air with two Variations.
The usual Minuet follows-a typical Haydn dance Movement.
The Finale is quick and spirited. In its opening drone bass, like the tune of a shepherd's pipe, it recalls Haydn's love of peasant music.
A S boy. Mozart was a wonderful pianist, as a youth, he was a capable violinist. This Concerto, with five others, comes from a time, about the age of nineteen, when he was particularly interested in the Violin, which he had studied under his father, one of the greatest teachers of the day.
The Concerto is in three Movements—a bold and brilliant opening one, a slow, expressive middle one, and a sparkling Rondo. The Orchestra Mozart used for the work contains only Strings, Oboes and Horns—with, in the Slow Movement, Flutes substituted for the Oboes.
THIS charmingly clear and contented music belongs to much the same period as the Violin Concerto we have already heard. (Its number is K.201). It is equally lightly scored-for Strings. Oboes and Horns. Every note tells, and the First Movement in particular is a lovely example of how to use one's tools. The longish Slow Movement follows (starting with the beautiful effect of muted Violins). Then comes the dainty Minuet, and a Finale whose spirits never flag-nor would they, we feel, if the Movement were twice as long.

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Henry J. Wood
Soprano: Dora Labbette
Tenor: Tudor Davies
Violin: Margaret Fairless

: VARIETY

CHRISSIE THOMAS and her Musical Glasses
IVAN FIRTH and PHYLLIS SCOTT in Comedy Duets
CLAPHAM and DWYER in a Spot of Bother
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA

Contributors

Unknown: Chrissie Thomas
Unknown: Ivan Firth
Unknown: Phyllis Scott








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