• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: A Ballad Concert

KATHLEEN HARTLEY (Mezzo-
Soprano)
GEORGE LAMBERT (Baritone)

: Organ Music

Played by EDWARD O'HENRY
Relayed from Tussaud's Cinema

: LIGHT MUSIC

LEONARDO KEMP and his PICCA
DILLY HOTEL ORCHESTRA From the Piccadilly Hotel

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

German Reading by Dr. HERBERT SCHROEDER: Die Weltminuto von Waterloo,' from ' Sternstunden der Menschheit,' by Stefan Zweig
2.20 Interlude
2.30 Miss RHODA POWER : 'Days of Old: The Middle Ages—II, St. Bertha's Day in Palestine '
3.0 Interlude
3.5 Miss RHODA POWER: Stories for Younger Pupils-II , Maroosia and the Twelve Months ' (Russian)

: DANCE MUSIC

JACK PAYNE and the B.B.C.
DANCE ORCHESTRA

: LIGHT MUSIC

ALPHONSE DU CLOS and his
ORCHESTRA
From the Hotel Cecil

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

Piano Solos by CECIL DixoN
The Story of ' The Golden Guineas' from ' Five Children and It '
(E. Nesbit )
Various Songs to suit the occasion, sung by MEGAN THOMAS
' The Wonderful Clock '-according to
Eleanor Farjeon

: 'The First News'

; WEATHER FORE
CAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

Pianoforte Transcriptions
Played by LESLIE ENGLAND

: Vaudeville

ALMA BARNES (In Songs and Impressions)
NORAH BLANEY (Songs at the Piano) BETTY CHESTER (In Comedy Songs)
THE THREE VIRGINIANS (Tait Bros. and Abbott)
LOUIS HERTEL
(In 100 % Talkie, ' Hit it again, Bo')
JACK PAYNE and THE B.B.C.
DANCE ORCHESTRA

: POINTS OF VIEW-I

Mr. G. Lowes DICKINSON
THE aim of this series-to which G. Bernard Shaw ,
H. G. Wells , Dean Inge , Sir Oliver Lodge , J. B. S. Haldane , and Lowes Dickinson himself will contribute-is to present to listeners the varied points of view of well-known men. Lowes Dickinson , who is introducing the series and will also close it, will perhaps be best known to listeners as the author of ' Letters to John Chinaman ' ; it was, however, his delightfully-written Modern Symposium ' which suggested the idea of the present series. Mr. Dickinson is Fellow of King's College, Cambridge, and one of the most important (if most retiring) contributors to modern thought.

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN; Local News; (Daventry only) Shipping Forecast and Fit Stock Prices

: AN ORCHESTRAL PROGRAMME

THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
Roy HENDERSON (Baritone)
ALTHOUGH the Overture, Poet and Peasant, is easily the first favourite of the few works of Suppe's which are now heard, Pique Dame must be a very good second. He was one of the many musicians whose great gifts appeared at an early age and who had to overcome some opposition before lie was allowed to take up music in earnest. He spent a busy life as conductor and composer, and one authority reports that he left no fewer than two Grand Operas and 165 stage pieces of less- serious dimensions, as well as at least two big works for the Church. In the latter part of last century two or three of his Light Operas were produced in London and enjoyed real success.
ELGAR'S Op. 27 is a Suite for Choir and Orchestra, called From the Bavarian Highlands, an echo of the composer's travels in that kindly part of the world. Three numbers of the Suite are for orchestra alone, and these are often played separately in the form of a Suite. The first is a light-hearted dance in which the tune enters boldly at the third bar. Once or twice its course is interrupted by a still more animated movement, and there is a more suave melody sometimes heard alone and sometimes along with the merry tune of the opening.
The second [dance, called In
Hammersbach, opens with three introductory bars, and then the first violins play the leading tune. Here, too, there is another, more smoothly flowing, melody, heard along with the first, and a quieter section in the middle of the piece.
The third, more vigorous than the others, begins energetically with reiterated notes. When the boisterous tune appears, it is played first by woodwinds. Again as in the other movements, there ia a more gracious melody which interrupts the energy of the dance from time to time, but it is the strenuous spirit of the opening which chiefly prevails and which brings the movement to an end with great strength and sonority.

: DANCE MUSIC

THE PICCADILLY PLAYERS, directed by AL STARITA, and THE PICCADILLY GRILL BAND, directed by JERRY HOEY , from the PICCADILLY
HOTEL








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel