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Listings

: A BALLAD CONCERT

GWLADYS GOWRIE (Contralto)
BERTRAM DAVIS (Tenor)

: FRASCATI'S ORCHESTRA

Directed by GEORGES HAECK
From the Restaurant Frascati

: A Light Classical Concert

SOPHIE WYSS (Soprano)
THE ENID BAILEY SEXTET

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR:

More from ' Mrs. WIGGS OF THE CABBAGE PATCH,' arranged as a dialogue story, with Incidental Music by THE GERSHOM
PARKINGTON QUINTET

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

HAYDN STRING QUARTETS
Played by THE BROSA STRING QUARTET

: Sir JOHN RUSSELL, D.Sc., F.R.S., ' The History of the English Countryside

—V, Rural England : The Central and Middle Western Regions ' mHE region covered by Sir John
-L Russell 's contribution to this series this evening, includes some of the richest pasture-lands and orchard valleys of England -the Cotswold country, Cheshire and North Shropshire, Worcestershire and its adjoining areas. The sheep-farming of central England and the fruit farming and dairying of the south-west are among the agricultural activities surveyed in this talk, together with the seasons for their development, if any, and their several prospects for the future.

: A CONCERT

TONI FARRELL (Entertainer) THE VICTOR OLOF SEXTET
MOZART'S Figaro is the same charming rascal as Rossini's Barber of Seville; and in Germany they have a little jest on the subject, telling that Figaro must have been a most ungrateful fellow because, although Rossini wrote a delightful opera in his honour, he must needs order the music for his wedding from the rival firm of Mozart.
The real name of the Opera is ' Figaro's
Wedding'; in this country alone is it referred to as ' The Marriage of Figaro,' not quite the same thing, as Figaro no doubt discovered for himself in the fulness of time.
It was one of the most immediately successful of all Mozart's works, both on its original appearance in Vienna and afterwards in Prague, Mozart wrote after this latter production to a friend: ' The, one subject of conversation here is 'Figaro '; nothing is played, sung or whistled, but 'Figaro.'
The Overture begins with a bustling theme played very softly in unison by the strings and bassoon. It is followed quickly by a dainty tune in which the oboe and flute alternate, reinforced immediately afterwards by the whole orchestra. Abrupt contrasts of loud and soft tone, lend the Overture much of its sense of light-hearted, almost irresponsible, gaiety. But the whole pioco is throughout so full of irresistible melody that one can easily believe Mozart's delighted report from Prague.

: 'The Jester of Notre Dame'

A Miracle in Three Acts by MASSENET
Libretto by MAURICE LENA
English Translation by M. LOUISE BAUM
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
(Chorus Master, STANFORD ROBINSON )
A CHORUS OF CHILDREN
From the Alexander Orphanage
Music Master, LESLIE WOODGATE
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Leader, S. KNEALE KELLEY )
Conducted by PERCY PITT
Relayed from the Parlophone Studio, by courtesy of the Parlophone Company
Cast :
Two Angels
Monks; Voices of Unseen Angels; Knights; Townsfolk;
Country Folk; Hucksters; Clerks and Beggars
A Crier-Monk. A Wag.
A Tipsy Man. A Knight.
A Voice.
Narrator, FILSON YOUNG
ACT I
Scene-The Square of Cluny

: Political Broadcast

Conservative Address by The Right Hon.
STANLEY BALDWIN
(S.B. from Manchester)

: ' The Jester of Notre Dame'

ACT II
Scene—The Cloister
ACT III
Scene-In the Chapel








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