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Listings

: A BALLAD CONCERT

CONSTANCE WENTWORTH (Soprano)
JAMES HICKEY (Baritone)

: FRASCATI'S ORCHESTRA

Directed by GEORGES HAECK
From the Restaurant Frascati

: Broadcast to Schools :

Miss C. VON WYSS: ' Nature Study for Town and Country Schools (Course III)— The Aquarium and other Homes for
Animals under Observation '

: A Light Classical Concert

ROSA BURN (Contralto)
THE MARIE WILSON STRING QUARTET

: ORGAN RECITAL by EDWARD O'HENRY

From Madame Tussaud 's Cinema

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR:

NOTHING VENTURE—NOTHING GAIN
-wherein we indulge in a perilous pastime
In other words, we go mountaineering with the Wicked Uncle!

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

SONGS OF SCHUMANN
Sung by JOHN THORNE (Baritone)
Op. 90, No. 3, Kommen und Scheiden (Meeting and Parting)
Op. 135, No. 5, Gebet (Prayer)
Op. 90, No. 1, Lied eines Schmiedes (Smith's Song) Op. 138, No. 2, Tief im Herzen trag ich Pein
(Deep in my heart I carry grief)
Op. 40, No. 4, Der Spielmann (The Minstrel) Op. 49, No. 1, Die Beiden Grenadiere (The two grenadiers)

: A PIANOFORTE RECITAL

by HAROLD CRAXTON
Ko. 5 in E Flat ; No. 3 in E
THERE were at least five-generations of English musicians in the family of Eccles, players and teachers of the Virginal, Viols, and later, the Violin. Solomon, the eldest of the name of whom we know anything, after some years successful practice as a musician, became a Quaker and not only abandoned music, but smashed all his instruments and made a bonfire of them along with his books on music. Then he adopted the calling' of shoemaker. Some years later, in 1667, he published a tract, setting forth a dispute between three people. One was ' a musician, zealous for the Church of England, who called Musick the gift of God.' Another was ' a Baptist who did affirm it to be a decent and harmless practice,' and the third was 'a Quaker (so-called) who, being formerly of that art, did give his judgment and sentence against it. but yet approved of the musick that pleased God.'
Two of his sons, John and Henry, left a considerable volume of music, John's mainly music for plays, and Henry's sonatas and solos for violin or viol. Henry was at one time a member of the English King's Band, but left this country for Paris, and became a member of the King's Band there. His violin music is rather after the manner of Corelli.
THE best known pianoforte music made of Paganini's violin studies is, of course, the series of transcriptions by Liszt He and Paganini, it will be remembered, had aroused the world of music to such astonishment by their amazing feats of technique, that it was usual to bracket their names as twin magicians. Paganini, indeed, was thought by some to be in league with the devil, so wholly astonishing were the things he did with his violin. Liszt's interest in the violinist's work induced him to transcribe a number of his most difficult studies ; these, when published in their final form, he dedicated to Schumann's wife, herself one of the great pianists of history. Schumann's versions, as is only to be expected, are less brilliant and showy than Liszt's, but invested with more of poetry and romance. They are really more Schumann than Paganini.

: The Flying Dutchman '

A Romantic Opera in Three Acts Written and Composed by Richard Wagner
(English Version by the Rev. J. Trout-beck, D.D.)
The Wireless Chorus
(Chorus-Master, Stanford Robinson)
The Wireless Symphony Orchestra
(Leader, S. Kneale Kelley )
Conducted by Percy Pitt
(Relayed from the Parlophone Studios, by the Courtesy of the Parlophone
Company)
Cast:
Chorus of Norwegian Maidens Crew of the Norwegian Vessel
Crew of the Flying Dutchman's Vessel
Scene : The Coast of Norway
Narrator: Filson Young
Act I








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

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