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: (Daventry only) ' Some Recipes for Egg Dishes '

IT is estimated that we use some 5,700 million eggs every year. This means that each of us eats about 125 eggs in the year. Only the lazy bachelor could be content with 125 hard-boiled eggs in the year': but even the most resourceful housewife is sometimes nonplussed as to how to vary the monotony of the inevitable egg. Here, then, are some variations.

: A CONCERT

ROSALIE GARNET (Soprano)
CEREDIG JONES (Baritone)
EVELYN COOKE (Violin)

: ALPHONSE DU CLOS and his ORCHESTRA

From tho Hotel Cecil
2.0 2.25 (Daventry only) Experimental Transmission of Still Pictures by the Fultograph
Process

: JACK PAYNE and the B.B.C.

DANCE ORCHESTRA
EMMIE JOYCE (Light Songs at the Piano)

: LOUIS LEVY'S ORCHESTRA

Conducted by ARNOLD EAGLE
From the Shepherd's Bush Pavilion

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

' THE VAGABOND ' (Maurice Baring)
Arranged as a Dialogue Story, with Incidental Music by THE OLOF
SEXTET

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

HANDEL HARPSICHORD PIECES
Played by BERNHARD ORD

: Lord RIDDELL : ' The International Printing Exhibition '

WHAT, one wonders, would Caxton with his simple printing press have made, for instance, of the great rotary presses that pour out into the world their millions of papers daily ? At the International Printing Exhibition, to bo held at Olympia this month, every branch of printing will be represented, including almost every kind of type from all countries. Special attention will be paid to publicity printing, such as posters, leaflets, etc. The last International Exhibition was held four years ago, but improvements have been so vast since then that the present exhibition, with its working models, will in no way cover the same ground. The interest in the International Printing Exhibition at Olympia is therefore not merely to the trade ; it is equally interesting to the public at large. Lord Riddell, the great newspaper proprietor and publisher, is eminently the person to introduce such an exhibition to the listener.

: Mrs. MARION CRAN ' The Small Garden ' (under the auspices of the National Gardens Guild)

T ISTENERS will welcome this reappearance before the microphone after Mrs. Cran's long absence. She appears under the auspices of the National Gardens Guild, whose object is to encourage the growing of flowers in industrial and populous centres of Great Britain and to federate the numerous Gardens Guild branches in different parts of the country. Mrs. Cran's subject is ' The Small Garden '-a feature particularly encouraged by the Guild, that holds, for instance, annual competitions for the best-kept garden in the suburbs.

: Chamber Music

HERBERT HEYNER (Baritone)
ORREA PERNEL (Violin) ; REBECCA CLARKE (Viola); MAY MUKLE (Violoncello); LESLIE
HEWARD (Pianoforte) (ORREA PERNEL, MAY MUKLE, and LESLIE)
HEWARD (ORREA PERNEL, REBECCA CLARKE and MAY
MUKLE)
ERNST VON DOHNANYI was only twenty when he made his first appearance as a concert pianist, stepping at once into the very front rank of executants. A year later, having won laurels in all the principal music centres of Germany and Austria-Hungary, he appeared with no less success in this country, and, in 1890, iu tho United States. As a composer he was known at first by his fresh and attractive music for his own instrument; for a good many years, however, he has been steadily gaining wider recognition as a composer of orchestral and chamber music, and latterly of music for the stage. Although making comparatively littlo use of actual folk tunes, most of his music is strongly characteristic of his native Hungary; it is all distinguished not only by very able craftsmanship, but by a genuine gift of invention, flavoured with a happy sense of laughter.
In this Serenade ho contrives to make wonderfully full effects from the three instruments, and the hearer never has any sense of the team's being too small. The movements are all short and compact; the first is a March, the second a Romance in which the viola first has the melody, handing it over to the violin later. The third is a Scherzo with an alternative section like the conventional Trio, except that it is more closely knit up with the opening part than the strict old tradition demanded. The fourth movement is a short and very simple theme followed by variations, and the last is a bustling Rondo which comes to an end with an echo of the sturdy rhythm of the opening March.

: QUARTET

DVORAK'S music took some time to make its way. beyond the bounds of his own country, but by the beginning of the last decade of the nineteenth century, when he had reached his fiftieth year, several of his more important works had been enthusiastically welcomed in America. In 1892 the National Conservatory of Music in New York invited him to become its Director, and, with the permission of the Prague Conservatoire, to which he was already bound, he went to the States and was given a splendid reception alike as teacher and conductor of his own music. But the noise and bustle of such a city depressed him, and after three years of growing homo sickness, he resigned his post and returned to the simplicity of his own country, taking up his old post as Professor in Prague.
This pianoforte quartet belongs to the period just before the American visit, so that it has never been claimed, like several of the works written in New York or after his return, as belong. ing to America and inspired by the native tunes. This is the genuine Bohemian Dvorak as we know him in the Slavonic dances.

: De Courville's Hour

Including JACK PADBURY 'S COSMO Club Six

: DANCE MUSIC

: CIRO'S CLUB
BAND, directed by RAMON NEWTON from Ciro'a Club








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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