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Listings

: Instrumental Solos

PIERRE FOL (Violin)
JESSIE CORMACK (Pianoforte)
4.0 Dance Music
ALFREDO and his BAND from the New Princes
Restaurant

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

Peeps into the Diary of Samuel Pepys , in honour of his birth on this day, in 1633 6.0 Musical Interlude
6 15 ;
WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN; Announcements and Sports Bulletin
6.40 Musical Interlude

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

HANDEL'S VIOLIN SONATAS
Played by EDA KERSEY
Sonata in E
Adagio ; Allegro; Largo; Allegro
7.0 Mr. HARVEY GRACE: 'Next
Week's Broadcast Music '
7.15 An Eye-Witness Account by Mr. L. J. CORBETT of the Wales v. France Rugby International (S.B. from Cardiff)
THE long-awaited revival of Welsh Rugby football appears this year to bo in sight, and this afternoon's match at Cardiff may do much to strengthen Wales's bid for the international championships. French visiting sides never fail to play hard, keen football, but they are seldom truly representative when travelling overseas, and the Welsh side that beat Scotland should have an excellent chance of accounting for the youngest country in the international tournament. This afternoon's play will be described by Mr. Corbett, the famous Bristol three-quarter, and former captain of the England XV.

: A Popular Symphony Concert

ANTONIO BROSA (Violin)
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Leader, S. KNEALE KELLEY
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
IT was Mendelssohn himself who gave this Symphony its name. It was largely written during travels in Italy in 1831, and embodies much of the brightness and sunshine which he enjoyed so thoroughly there.
The principal tune of the first movement is played at the outset by the violins, a tune which bubbles over with exhilaration and freshness. Mendelssohn himself said that this was going to be the gayest orchestral music he had ever written, and it is easy to agree with him. The second main tune, no less joyous than the first, is played to begin with by clarinets and bassoons, and as the first part of the movement ends, there is a gracious little melody which appears again in the coda. At the beginning of the working-out section a new theme is begun by second violins, on which a short Fugato is built up, leading to the return of the first theme. The second theme is then heard as a violoncello solo.
For some unknown reason, the second movement has been given the name ' The Pilgrims' March.' The principal tune is begun by violas and woodwinds, and carried on by violins along with flutes. There is another tune in the second part of the movement which clarinets play first. The movement is quiet and serious in mood as compared with the others.
The third movement is not really a Scherzo; something like a Minuet, it has a gracious tune which strings play first. In the alternative section (the Trio) there is an important phrase for horns and bassoons, to which first violins and then flutes reply.
The last movement is a very light-hearted and bustling Saltarello or Tarantella in which there are three tunes, all vigorous merry dance rhythms.
9.0 WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN
9.15 Mr. C. R. ASHBEE: The Ugliness Exhibition - Can we save the Countryside 1 '
NEXT Monday Mr. Ramsay MacDonald will open, at the R.I.B.A. Galleries in London, the 'ugliness exhibition' organized by the conference of societies interested in the preservation of rural England, which has already appeared, and will later appear in many provincial towns. The exhibition is designed to show in the most graphic fashion how careless and flagrant advertising and unconsidered building can mar the most beautiful countryside and deface the most historic monuments. The work of the Countryside and Footpaths Conference has already resulted in the removal of many disfigurements up and down the country, and it is particularly gratifying that many large advertisers, and owners of sites have agreed to abandon the use of unsightly signs, at considerable loss to themselves.
9.30 Local Announcements. (Daventry only) Shipping Forecast

: Vaudeville

CLAPHAM and DWYER
(in Another Spot of Bother)
HEREWABD DRYSDALE
(Whistling Solos) MAMIE SOUTTER
(The Queen of Comedy)
Tommy HANDLEY
(Comedian)
A VARIETY ITEM from
THE LONDON PALLADIUM
JACK PAYNE and The B.B.C. DANCE
ORCHESTRA

: DANCE MUSIC

FRED ELIZALDE and his SAVOY HOTEL Music. From the Savoy Hotel








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