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Listings

: A Concert

META MURRAY (Contralto)
THE MADALENE MOONEY QUARTET

: BROADCAST TO SCHOOLS

Sir WALFORD DAVIES
(a) A Beginner's Course
(b) An Intermediate Course with Short Concert
(c) A Short Advanced Course

: LOUIS LEVY'S ORCHESTRA

Conducted by ARNOLD EAGLE
From the Shepherd's Bush Pavilion

: BROADCAST TO SCHOOLS

Rev. J. ARBUTHNOT NAIRN, Litt.D. : ' The Classics in Translation — II, Translators of the Elizabethan Age'

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

' The Lemon-Sponge '—a ' moving ' story written by Denis MacKail and specially arranged as a dialogue story for broadcasting
Incidental Music by THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

STUDIES AND OTHER PIANOFORTE PIECES BY
DEBUSSY
Played by NIEDZIELSKI
Dos pas sur la neige (Dancing on the Snow)
Mazurka
La Danse do Puck (Puck's Dance)
Etude pour lcsarpeges composes (Arpeggio Study)
Etude pour les cinq doigts (Five-finger Study)

: Questions for Women Voters

VIII-' Does protective legislation benefit women wage-earners 1 ' A Discussion between
Mrs. ELIZABETH ABBOTT and Dr. MARION PHILLIPS
THERE are two strongly divided schools of J- thought on this question. On the one hand, there are those who believe that if women workers are hedged about with special restrictions and classed with ' young persons '—as is often the case-with regard to hours of work and so on, this handicaps them in the labour market. On the other hand, there are those who believe that without some such regulations, women are easily exploited, and conditions for men workers as well as for women are lowered. The speakers tonight have each taken a leading part in these two camps. Mrs. Abbott as Chairman of the Open Door Council, and Dr. Marion Phillips as Chief Woman Officer of the Labour Party.

: Professor W. E. TURNER: Glass in Modern Civilization— III, Old-Timo Glass Marking.' S.B. from Sheffield.

IN this evening's talk Professor Turner considers the methods of glass-making adopted in the ancient world when glass was made by hand. Ho deals with Egyptian and Assyrian glass-makers and, most interesting of all, with the glass-makers of Venice, with their curious tradition of secrecy which was an essential part of their craft.

: A Military Band Concert

WYNNE AJELLO (Soprano)
LEONARD GOWINGS (Tenor)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL ,

8.0-8.30 (Daventry only)
Professor LEONARD RUSSELL: The Modern Outlook - III, Can Clear Ideas be Trusted?' Relayed from Birmingham
Clear ideas are frequently considered a panacea of all evil, but the deification of reason, as exemplified by the teaching of Descartes and the notorious cult of Robespierre, is open to certain disadvantages. Professor Russell will consider this evening the difficulty of getting any ideas, however transparently reasonable they may seem, that are altogether trustworthy.
A HUMORESQUE is not necessarily a humorous piece. The name means rather something capricious and wayward. But in this music by the popular conductor of the Wireless Military Band there are flashes of real humour, as is only right and proper when a. composer is a genial Irishman.
Mr. O'Donnell is, of course, not merely a military bandmaster with the conventional training and traditions of such a task; he is a thoroughly equipped all-round musician, whose work for orchestra is no less distinguished than for the band.
The names of these three pieces are almost all that listeners require by way of guidance. Over a vigorous bass the first begins with a rather pompous tune for cornets and woodwinds. Clarinets answer it, a little pertly, and then there is an expressive slower section with a cornet solo. After that, the vigour of the opening returns, and the piece ends whimsically with a swift little rush.
Number two has a few bars of capricious prelude and then clarinets and flutes together play the merry, leaping tune; there is a short, more emphatic interlude which leads to a gracious waltz with a tune not unlike the first one. Again, there is an emphatic interruption and the opening melody returns,
To the third and last movement there are again a few bars of prelude, and then in tho most vivacious measure, clarinets and alto saxophones play the hurrying tune. It comes to an end quietly, and in slower measure the woodwinds, softly at first, have a contrasting theme. There is a horn solo in the manner of recitative, which leads to a return of the beginning, and a coda in three short sections, one quick and strenuous, one more majestic, and one in the swift measure of the opening, rounds off the movement and the suite.

: A RECITAL

By ISOLDE MENGES (Violin) and DALE SMITH (Baritone)

: DANCE MUSIC

: JAY WHIDDEN'S
BAND from the Carlton Hotel








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