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Listings

: A CONCERT

VIOLET JACKSON (Soprano)
THE DORIAN Trio

: BROADCAST TO SCHOOLS: Sir WALFORD DAVIES

(a) A Beginner's Course
(b) An Intermediate Course with a Short Concert
(c) A Short Advanced Course

: LOUIS LEVY'S ORCHESTRA

Conducted by ARNOLD EAGLE
From the Shepherd's
Bush Pavilion

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

'THE EMPEROR'S NEW
CLOTHES'
A Story by Hans Andersen
Adapted as a play (for broadcasting) by C. E. HODGES
Incidental Music by THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON
QUINTET

: The Foundations of Music

STRING TRIOS BY BEETHOVEN
Played by KENNETH SKEAPING (Violin)
BERNARD SHORE (Viola)
EDWARD J. ROBINSON (Violoncello)
Op. 9, No. 1, Third and Fourth Movements
Op. 9, No. 3, First Movement
A PLEASING Scherzo and a no less attractive
Finale make up the third and fourth movements of Beethoven's String Trio in G (Op. 9, No. I), of which the first two were played yesterday. The Scherzo is interesting as being one of the first of the many wonderful movements of this type which Beethoven wrote, and in its vigour and go it is thoroughly characteristic of his methods. It has the usual middle section, or Trio, of a smoother and more melodious character.
The Finale, a vivacious Presto, opens with a bustling first theme in tripping quavers. which is followed by another of a less distinctive type, after which comes the second main theme. This is of a stronger and more severe character than the first, in longer notes, mounting upwards on a sort of drone bass and ending in some striking modulations, or changes of key, which must have considerably puzzled the orthodox hearers of Beethoven's day. On these materials a splendidly effective Finale is built up.
The Trio in C Minor (Op. 9, No. 3), the first movement of which is also being played this evening, is generally regarded as the finest of these early trios of Beethoven, and as such, it will well repay attentive hearing. Its opening movement (Allegro con spirito) is distinguished alike by the wealth of its thematic material and by the vigour and originality with which this is treated.

: QUESTIONS FOR WOMEN VOTERS'—VII, DAME EDITH LYTTLETON, D.B.E.: 'Foreign Affairs and how they affect us '

THE opening talk in the second half of this important series is being given by a prominent public woman who, in addition to having very wide interests and activities, has a particularly intimate knowledge of foreign affairs. Dame Edith Lyttleton is a member of the executive committee of the Royal Institute of International Affairs, and the committee of the English-Speaking Union, and she has represented the British Government at the League of Nations Assembly for the last four years.

: Prof. W. E. S. TURNER: 'Glass in Modern Civilization—I, What is Glass ? ' S.B.from Sheffield

mONIGHT'S is the first of a series of six talks by Professor Turner, who is Professor of Glass Technology in the University of Sheffield, past president and secretary of the Society of Glass Technologists, and a well-known international authority on this subject. In this series he confines himself more or less entirely to utilitarian glass, an aspect of the subject which is scarcely ever dealt with in any popular literature. In his first talk he considers what glass is, the materials of which it is composed, and its various uses.

: A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

WYNNE AJELLO (Soprano)
HERBERT SIMMONDS (Baritone) THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL

: A Handel Programme

ROGER CLAYSON (Tenor) LIONEL TERTIS (Viola)
THE WIRELESS Chorus and THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
Overture, ' Samson ' Andante ; Allegro; Menuet
ROGER CLAYSON , Chorus and Orchestra

: Dance Music

Ciro's Club Band, under the direction of Ramon Newton, from Ciro's Club








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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