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Listings

: Our Boys and Girls

Dr. MABEL BRODIE, 'The New Baby'
LAST week Mrs. Wintringham introduced the new series of morning talks on ' Our Boys And Girls.' Today Dr. Mabel Brodie, who is giving the first two talks on ' The Child at Home,' will deal with the problems of the new baby, going on next week to the 'ex-baby.' She has been Assistant Medical Inspector to the Ministry of Health and Senior Welfare Medical Officer to the Durham County Council.

: LIGHT Music

KATIE Moss (Soprano)
THE ROWLEY TRIO

: BROADCAST TO SCHOOLS:

Mr. A. LLOYD JAMES: 'Speech and Language'

: 'School Sets,' by THE B.B.C.

SENIOR EDUCATIONENGINEER

: Evensona

From Westminster Abbey

: A Concert in the Studio

MARJORIE INGHAM (Soprano)
THE LONDON ENSEMBLE QUINTET
JACK PAYNE and THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR:

Professor WlNDLESPOOF will once more present his Celebrated Wax-works, the whole Exhibition having been newly renovated and brought up-to-date

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

BACH'S CHORAL PRELUDES played by LEOKARU WARNER
From St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate
Christus, dcrunsseligmacht (Christ Who Blesseth us) Ach wio fluchtig, ach wie nichtig (Ah, how fleeting, ah, how vain)
Christi, unscr Herr, um Jordan Kam (Christ Our
Lord to the Jordan came)
Wachet auf (Awake!)
Christum wir sollen loben schon (Christ we must now praise)

: A Violoncello Recital

By Cedric Sharpe

Peace - Eric Fogg, arr. Cedric Sharpe
Little Columbine - Albert Sammons
Even-Song - Saint-Amory
An old-time Dance - Cedric Sharpe

: A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

A Request Programme
OWEN BRYNGWYN(Baritone)
THF. WIRELESS MILITARYBAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
ROSSINI, happily remembered as fhe most modest and good-humoured musician who ever lived, holds his place on the operatic stage of today solely by The Barber of Scville-in spite of its age, one of the best Comic Operas which the world possesses. His serious work,
William Tell , is no less worthy of affectionate regard, but except for the Overture, it has apparently disappeared from the present-day theatre. The Overture, is, however, ever green, and bids fair to remain so. In its original orchestral form, it begins, as listeners will remember, with a fine tuneful section for the violoncellos in four parts, popular with the violoncello players and listeners alike. The section which follows describes a great storm among the hills; calm succeeds and fine tuneful section for the 'cellos in four parts, popular with 'cello players and with listeners alike. The section which follows describes a great storm among the hills ; calm succeeds and a quiet pastoral scene, and there is a stirring march, these combining to make the Overture picturesque and graphic in a way that the Overtures for the older Italian operas did not by any means always achieve. The characteristic tone of the violoncellos, at the beginning, cannot quite bo reproduced by a military band, but the universal popularity of the Overture in the latter form makes it clear that the average listener is no pedant in the matter of characteristic tone. The tunes matter to him more than the voices or instruments which present them.

Overture, ' William Tell' - Rossini

: BAND

TTNLIKE the dance tunes of the present day, many of those of a former generation can still be played and enjoyed simply as music, without much thought of the dances for which they were written. The Waltzes of Johann Strauss are among the best examples of such music, and there are many others scarcely less worthy. Joseph Gung 'l, at one time schoolmaster, then a soldier, and latterly a famous bandmaster and composer of marches and dance tunes, left some three hundred pieces, almost all full of delightful tunes and vigorous rhythm, many of which still figure from time to time in light and popular programmes. The family tradition was carried on, as it was in the Strauss family; his nephew Johann also composed many popular dance tunes, and, like his uncle, made many successful tours in Europe with them.

: Local Announcements.

' (Daventry only) Shipping
Forecast

: 'Clothes Props'

A PREPOSTEROUS PROGRAMME
(' I intended an ode,
But Rose crossed the road
In her latest new bonnett......') Some are born programme builders, some achieve programme building, and some (like Jones) have programme building thrust upon them.
'Clothes Props'—his first, and certainly his last, constructive effort-originated from an audition of some suitings, and so betrays strong sartorial influences.
By a fortunate accident, a dictaphone, left revolving in his office, has simplified the reconstruction of the crime, and the record will offer an explanation, if not an excuse, for the preposterous result.
We regret that it has been found impossible to substitute another programme. Mr. Jones has been now transferred to the Waste Paper Department.
STUART ROBERTSON
OLIVE GROVES
DORA GREGORY
ANN STEPHENSON
THE REVUE CHORUS
THE GERSHOMPARKISGTONQUINTET

: DANCE MUSIC: FRED ELIZALDE

and his SAVOY HOTEL Music, from the Savoy Hotel








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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