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Listings

: A CONCERT IN THE STUDIO

ERNEST ALLEN (Tenor)
NINA JOEL (Violin)
JESSIE FURZE (Pianoforte)

: The Week's Recital of Gramophone Records

Arranged by Mr. CHRISTOPHER
STONE

: BROADCAST TO SCHOOLS:

Mr. A. Lloyd JAMES : Speech and Language '

: EVENSONG

From WESTMINSTER ABBEY

: Mr. ARTHUR J. BENDY :

' Odd Jobs about the House-IV, Simple Upholstery He-pairs

: A Concert in the Studio

OLIVE HEMINGWAY (Soprano) CORELLI WINDEATT 'S OCTET

: THE CHILDREN'S . HOUR:

Folk Songs, sung by GEORGE PlZZEY
'The Warning'—the Story of a Vixen (H. Mortimer Batten )
And, as a contrast,
Some more- about ' The Zoo that Never Was '

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

SCHUBERT'S PIANOFORTE
SONATAS
Played by MARTHA BAIRD

: Major GORDON HOME: Life in Roman Britain-IV, Domestic Life '

THIS evening the intimate details of the -L private house in Roman Britain are the subject of Major Home's talk. He describes the architecture and materials, external and internal decoration, questions of warming, baths, drains, and lighting. He goes on to discuss such intriguing details as kitchens, nurseries, and table ware ; locks and keys ; personal dress and ornaments ; gardens, sculpture, and the household gods.

: Hallé Concert

Relayed from the Free Trade Hall
S.B. from Manchester
THE HALLÉ ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Sir HAMILTON HARTY
THIS colossal work was Schubert's last Symphony. It was quite beyond the powers of the Viennese orchestra of his day, and never, in fact, got beyond rehearsal in his lifetime. When Schubert tackled big-scale works such as Symphonies his sense of design hardly rose to the occasion. He resorted to giving out a continuous melody of a similar type to his beautiful songs, then repeating it, and eventually passing on, often" with no particular progression of thought, to another tune. So say those who criticize this unusually protraded Symphony. Others retort that his tunes and his use of them are divine, so that it is impossible to have an excess of them. Anyone hearing this work for the first time is fairly certain to agree with the enthusiasts rather than the critics. At any rate, no one can find much difficulty in following the Symphony.
It has four Movements.
The FIRST Movement opens with a stately
Introduction, constructed on the tune given out unadomed'by Horns at the opening. It leads without a break into the quick Movement proper— splendid, exultant music, which, even when it becomes tender, is still rapturous.
The SECOND MOVEMENT has a distnictly song-like character. The Strings start a soft, throbbing groundwork, then the Oboe begins a slow, expressive tune, which dominates the Movement.
The THIRD MOVEMENT is a very exhilarating one which almost conforms to the strict meaning of its title, ' Scherzo '-' a jest.'
The FOURTH Movement is an impetuous Finale of resistless force.

: Interlude from the Manchester Studio

HELEN HENSCHEL (Mezzo-Soprano), with her own accompaniment
HARY JANOS is a Comic
Opera produced in Budapest in 1926. The composer told Lawrence Gilman (from whose notes, written for the Philharmonic Society of New
* York, the following information is drawn) that Hary Janos is a national hero of folk-lore, an ex-soldier, who tells long-bow tales of his great adventures. There is, too, in Hary a symbol of Hungarian aspirations.
There are six sections in the Suite. Háry's tale is launched, in the first Movement, with a sneeze by one of the hearers (this, in Hungary, is regarded as a confirmation of what has just been said).
In the Second Movement
Hary tells of finding himself in the Imperial Palace in Vienna, and describes a wonderful mechanical musical clock he saw there.
The Third Movement suggests the old home of Hary and his sweetheart, and the songs that are sung there.
In the Fourth Movement
Hary performs prodigies of valour against the French army, massacring his thousands, and finally.so terrifying Napoleon himself that he pleads, on his knees, for mercy.
Next comes an Intermezzo that has no story.
The last Movement is a triumphal march, during which Hary tells of seeing the entry of the Austrian Emperor and his court; again, we have the countryman's quaint ideas of the glories of the city.

: The Wireless Chorus

Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
STUDENTS' SONGS








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