• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: A SONATA RECITAL

AUDRIE FORD (Violin)
HAWARD CLARKE (Pianoforte)

: AN ORGAN RECITAL

From ST. MARY-LE-Bow CHURCH by CHARLES F. WATERS
Relayed from St. Mary-le-Bow Church

: LUNCH-TIME Music'

By the HOTEL METROPOLE ORCHESTRA (Leader,
A. MANTOVANI ), from the Hotel Metropole

: PLAYS TO SCHOOLS

Shakespeare's ' 'Julius Cæsar'

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR :

GLIMPSES OF ROUMANIA
Folk Songs and Melodies, Verse and Stories from
Roumania, by SALI and ROMA LOBEL

: FRANK WESTFIELD'S ORCHESTRA

From the Prince of Wales
Playhouse, Lewisham

: FRANK WESTFIELD'S

ORCHESTRA (Continued)

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

CHOPIN'S NOCTURNES
Played by EDWARD ISAACS
(Pianoforte)
Nocturne in E, Op. 62, No. 2 Nocturne in F Minor, Op. 55,
No. 1

: FAY COMPTON

in selections from ' Kiddilogues' and ' Kiddies' Hour,' by EILEEN DE MANCHA
At the Piano, the Composer :
H. C. G. STEVENS

: A NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERT

Relayed from the Queen's Hall
THE HALLÉ ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Sir HAMILTON HARTY
LEOPOLD GODOWSKY (Pianoforte)
THERE are two Movements in Bach's Concerto with no break between ; they are connected by two sustained chords. Both Movements nre quick. The second is rather like a jig, in the familiar rhythm of two-in-a-bar, each beat being divided into three bits.
BERLIOZ in this work follows the moods of an imaginary love-sick youth, whose constant thought is his beloved maiden. She is represented by a melody which appears in various forms during the course of the work. This (fairly long) theme first occurs near the beginning of the First Movement, which is entitled Visions and Passions. The titles of the other four Movements are respectively, A Ball, Scenes in the Country, March to the Scaffold (here, says the composer, the youth dreams he has murdered the woman he loves, that he is under sentence of death, and is being led to execution '), and finally Dream of a Witches' Sabbath.

: NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERT

(Continued)
THERE are in this Concerto (it is Beethoven's
Op. 58, in the key of G) several points of treatment that were new and striking when the work was produced.
. FIRST MOVEMENT. The first new thing is that instead of beginning with the usual burst of Full Orchestra (a plan ho had followed in his three earlier Concertos), Beethoven lets the Soloists announce the First Main Tune. Besides this, there are several other leading tunes, the Second Main one being given to Violins (a minor key melody in ' arpeggio' steps), and two or three others being brought in. The SECOND MOVEMENT provides another of the work's points of rarity and interest. It is very short, and consists of a lovely dialogue between Orchestra' and Pianoforte, the former stating an emphatic, almost imperious Tune, and ' the latter replying in smooth, quiet, thoughtful passages, as if sweetly reasoning with the other's impatience.
THIRD MOVEMENT. This is a sprightly Rondo, clearly and cleanly built.
SH. BRAITHWAITE is a . native of Cumberland
(bom 1883), and an ex-student of the Royal Academy, London. He gives no basis for his Snow Picture other than the title. The Piano, the bell like Glockenspiel and various other Percussion instruments have a good deal to do with the ' atmospherics ' of the piece.
STANFORD stated that the Rhapsody was inspired by ' an episode in the legend of the Finns and the loves of Cuchullin the Emer.' which will convey clear ideas to any Irishman versed in the legendary lore of his land.

: VARIETY

CHARLES TREHARNE (Baritone)
FRANK STAFF (Comedian)








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel