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Listings

: THE LONDON RADIO DANCE BAND

Conducted by SIDNEY FIRMAN
GWEN MAWDESLEY (Entertainer)

: WILLIAM HODGSON'S

MARBLE ARCH PAVILION ORCHESTRA
From the Marble Arch Pavilion

: Mr. J. C. SQUIRE : ' A Modern Poet (Walter de ]a Mare) '

THE first of the two modern poets whom Mr.
J. C. Squire chose as his subjects in these talks was the Poet Laureate, Dr. Robert Bridges , the most conspicuous example of classicism in modern poetry. Today he will deal with the most elfish and unearthly of living English writers —Mr. de la Mare , tho author of such books as ' Motley,' ' Broomsticks,' ' Come Hither,' and ' Peacock Pie.'

: Miss ANN KINDERSLEY : ' Exploring Luxemburg.'

EXCEPT for a short period of prominence during the early days of the war, Luxemburg has long been one of the least known corners of Europe, and people who are quite learned about France and Belgium are often curiously ignorant of the charm of the little Duchy that adjoins them both. Miss Ann Kindersley will let in some light on their darkness with her talk this afternoon.
(Picture on page 467.)

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR :

' Spring Cleaning at Folly Manor'—a mild 'extravaganza' by the Wicked Uncle and various other people

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

DUETS FOR Two PIANOS
J'layed by DOROTHY FOLKARD and MURIEL
WARNE
BEETHOVEN
Marches Nos. 2 and 3

: Professor A. Y. Campbell: Greek Plays for Modern Listeners-II, Æschylus and his 'Oresteia.'

In his first talk Professor Campbell explained the general characteristics of Greek tragedy and those points of contrast with modem plays that must be realized if we are to understand the great works of the Greek dramatists as they are meant to be understood. In the next four talks he goes on to deal with the greatest playwrights whose works we know - Æschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes - —starting today with Æschylus, the creator of Clytemnestra and Orestes, the Lady Macbeth and the Hamlet of the Greek world.
(S.B. from Liverpool)

7.45 HAROLD MOSS OCTET ALICE LILLEY (Soprano) OCTET Overture to the ' Merry Wives of Windsor ' Nicolai Hungarian Dance, ' 'Gipsy Airs ' Sarasate Solo Violin, HAROLD Moss

Contributors

Speaker: Professor A.Y. Campbell

: (Daventry only) Mrs. MARY ADAMS : 'Problems of Heredity—II, How Heredity is Studied '

TN her second talk Mrs. Adams will describe the three methods in which heredity can bo studied ; the search for evidence in pedigrees, with a view to discovery whether ability is inherited ; the creation of evidence by scientific breeding of plants and animals, and the study of chromosomes, which means getting right down to the physical bases on which heredity rests.

: AN ORGAN RECITAL

by EDGAR T. COOK
Relayed from SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL

: ' LA SERVA PADRONA'

(' The Maid turn'd Mistress
Libretto by G. A. FEDERICO
Composed by PERGOLESI
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by ARTHUR BLISS
SEVENTEENTH - CENTURY Italians liked variety in their evenings at the Opera. Between the Acts of the serious works were placed slighter, humorous pieces, termed ' Intermezzi.' La Serva Padrona (The Maid turned Mistress) is such a piece. It was first performed in 1733, on a gala evening in Naples, when the birthday of the Empress Christina was celebrated.
The plot is very simple. The gloomy old
Uberto, tired of quarrelling with his wilful servant girl Serpina, decides to marry someone. Serpina thinks she would like to be his wife, and disguises the serving-man Vespone (who never gets a word in edgeways), pretending that he is a ferocious fellow and that she is going to marry him. Poor Uberto, partly afraid and partly sorry for Sorpina, agrees to marry her himself ; then the truth is disclosed, and all ends happily.
Apparently, composition did not bring Pergolosi much prosperity, for when he died in 1736, at the age of twenty-six, his few possessions had to be sold to pay the expenses of his funeral.








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