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Listings

: Mr. ERIC PARKER : ' Out of Doors from Week to Week—IV, Early Song '

THE gentleman who annually writes to The
-*- Times to say that he has heard the first cuckoo has not yet dipped his pen in the ink. pot, but the chorus of song has already been started by the less celebrated birds. In this afternoon's talk Mr. Eric Parker will describe some new members of the choir-blackbirds, chaffinches, yellow-hammers and woodpeckers -and the distinctive features of their songs.

: EVENSONG

Relayed from Westminster Abbey

: The Rev. W. H. ELHOTT : ' The Seamy Side of Life '—A Lenten Address

T ISTENERS will remember a remarkable series of Lenten addresses delivered last year by the Rev. W. H. Elliott , the Vicar of Holy Trinity, Folkestone, and a well-known broadcast preacher. Last year he talked of ' the sunny side of life ' ; this year he deals with ' the seamy side '—a less promising subject at first sight, but on reflection, one that yields no less material for serious and even inspiring thought ; at least for those who do not wish to close their minds to all but the most reassuring and doubt-dispelling aspects of life. This series of addresses will be continued every Thursday afternoon throughout Lent.

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR:

' Hepzibah Hen has a narrow escape '—a new Farmyard Adventure by OLWEN BOWEN
RONALD GOURLEY in Songs and Imitations ' Zoo Whys,' with LESLIE G. MAINLAND as Chief Purveyor of Information

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

SCHUMANN'S KREISLERIANA and PHANTASIE-
STÜCKE (FANTASY PIECES)
Played by WILLIBALD RICHTER
Phantasiestiicke Grillen (Whims). Des Abends
(In the Evening). Aufschwung (Soaring)

: Mr. DESMOND MACCARTHY : How to Appreciate Poetry '

POETS are honoured, in common repute, as much as men of action ; yet they are little read, and the true appreciation of poetry is very sparsely diffused. In this evening's talk—the last in the series on ' How to Appreciate '— Mr. Desmond MacCarthy will attempt to explain why this is, and how we ought to read different kinds of poetry so as to enjoy them fully.

: CASANO'S OCTET

LEONIE ZIFADO (Soprano)
SINCLAIR LOGAN (Baritone) IN the Colonial Song, Grainger says he has endeavoured to express some of the feelings aroused by the contemplation of the varied scenes of his native Australia.
THE first air is one of a a number composed by Richard Leveridge , a' famous bass singer, who appeared in some of Purcell's works towards the end of the seventeenth century, and in at least one of Handel's English productions. His voice long remained powerful, and at the age of sixty he offered to sing a song against any man in England, for a wager of a hundred guineas. Singing appears to have been good for him, for he was not far off ninety when he died.
Of Leveridge's songs we remember the names of but a few, among them, The Roast Beef of Old England, All in the. Downs, and the one we are about to hear, the jovial Beggar's Song.
MY LOVELY CELIA is a tormented lover's plea to a fair maid to ease his troubled mind by showing him she loves him.
THE philosophy of Come, let's be merry. is much akin to that of the ancient saying that reminds us ' tomorrow we die ' :
Time it will your youth decay ;
Then try to live and enjoy while you may.
THE warrior-maidens who bring to Valhalla the bodies of warriors from the battlefield, who shall serve to guard that home of the gods, are speeding through the air.
In this Prelude to the Third Act of The
Valkyries we have a wonderfully vivid depiction of the galloping of the horses. There are few finer suggestions of elemental force in all music.

: The Annual Dinner of the CHAMBER OF SHIPPING OF THE UNITED KINGDOM

Speeches relayed from the Guildhall
'THE SHIPPING INDUSTRY,' proposed by H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES, K.G.
Responded to by Sir WILLIAM SEAGUR. D.L., J.P., President of the Chamber of Shipping
ONE of the oldest of our industries, shipping
" is also one of the very most important. British ships are met with in every corner of the world, and the reputation of the ship and the seaman alike stand as high as ever they did. Tonight Britain's most popular broadcaster, The Prince of -Wales, has an ideal subject on which to speak, and everyone will want to hear what he has to say.

: VARIETY

JEANNE CHEVREAU
(Harpist)
DESLYS and CLARK








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