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: A BRITISH PROGRAMME

THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
KATE WINTER (Soprano)
KENNETH ELLIS (Baritone)
FOR the Cardiff Musical Festival of 1904 German wrote this Rhapsody upon Welsh airs. It is woven without scum, but has four pretty definite sections, a little like those of a Symphony, and each of them grows out of some famous old Welsh melody or melodies.
The FIRST (a stately one) is based on 'Loudly Proclaim.'
The SECOND (a. skittish one) is made out of 'Hunting the Hare' and 'The Bells of Aberdovey'.
The THIRD ( a tender one) brings in 'David of the White Rock.'
The FOURTH (a march-like Finale) uses the famous ' Men of Harlech.'
THE work is founded on old Cornish folk tunes (several of which were used, in a modified form, in the work On the Cornish Coast which the Composer wrote for the Crystal Palace Brass Band competition in 1924). It opens with the sea shanty Lowlands
Liyw, which is given out by the brass and developed at some length.
The opening fragment of the tune plays an important part throughout the work, serving, in various guises, to bind the different sections together.
A second theme (Woolycombe) now becomes more prominent and is shortly followed by a quieter section in which the tune A maiden sat weeping, announced by the Oboe, plays the most important part.
The vigorous development of these themes suggests the rugged storm-bound Cornish coast.
The next tune to appear is that of the Helston Furry Dance. This is introduced, apparently, by the oldest inhabitant of the place-somewhat unsteady on his feet. Others take up the Dance, and when it is in full swing, yet another tune, the Song of the Western Men, steals in, and the two themes are heard together in the Coda.
THIS piece was composed for performance by the massed Bands at Wembley on Empire Day three years ago. It is built upon a number of somewhat unfamiliar tunes, the first of which, Tadg bui (Yellow Tim) was taken down by the Composer from a singer of folk-songs in County Cork. An Antrim tune, and snatches of The Green Ribbon, lead to the appearance, as a Euphonium solo, of Along the Ocean Slwre. The Clarinets next start a 'chorus Jig,' and a Pipers' Dance is heard a little later. Two more tunes are used, and then the last section is made out of two Reels.
IT has been suggested that in the three Movements which constitute this Suite the composer intended to pay homage to the three great races of Celts in the British Isles-the Scottish, the Welsh, and the Irish.
The Claim. There are three chief features in this first piece. The rugged energetic opening Tune seems to suggest the Highlands of Scotland. Later a more tranquil, rustic Tune is heard, characteristically Scottish. Then we hear a Call (perhaps the summoning of the Clans), and after this most of the foregoing material is treated in various ways, including suggestions of the bag-pipes.
A Lament. This is the piece that has been likened to Welsh folk-song. It consists chiefly of a simple, expressive melody which is worked up by the orchestra to a telling climax.
The Call. The last piece is very spirited and vigorous. There are in it three chief Tunes, the first of which suggests an Irish Jig, the second a Hornpipe, and the third a March. These three combine to make a brilliant ending.

: A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

Studio Service conducted by the Very Rev.
Dom. BEDE JARRETT, 0.1'.. of St. Dominic's
Priory, with the Choir from St. Dominic's Priory (Choirmaster, Mr. VERNON GRANT)
Order of Service I
Part of Compline Reading
Hymn, Praise to the Holiest' (W.H., No. 56) Address by the Very Rev. Dom. BELL JARRETT
, O.P.
Canticle
Prayers
Hymn, ' Sweet Saviour, Bless us ere we go '
(W.H., 215)
WHEN St. Dominie founded his Order seven centuries ago, he designed it as an Order of Preachers, whose chief battleground was to be the pulpit. To this day the Dominicans have retained this characteristic ; their ranks : aro always rich in good preachers, and Dom Bedo Jarrett, whose sermon will bo broadcast tonight, is one of the most distinguished men, both as a preacher and as a writer, in the Order in England today.

: THE WEEK'S GOOD CAUSE :

Appeal on behalf of the Margaret MacDonald Clinio, by the Rt. Hon. J. RAMSAY MACDONALD, M.P.
PLANNED originally by Mrs. Margaret MacDonald as a memorial to that devoted social worker, Mrs. Mary Middleton , the Kensington Baby Clinic and Hospital was only actually established after the death of Mrs. MacDonald herself, and her name was included in its title. The Clinic, which was the first of its kind, has been enlarged by the addition of a Mothers' Clinic and a Baby Hospital, and it now treats over 5,000 cases a year. Mr. Ramsay MacDonald , who makes the appeal, is a writer whose varied gifts have been responsible as well for books of political controversy as for travel but ho has written nothing more notable than his memoir of his wife, which appeared after her death in 1911. Contributions should be addressed to [address removed]

: CHAMBER MUSIC

The LONDON CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
(Leader, SAMUEL KUTCHER )
Conducted by ANTHONY BERNAND
ODETTE DE FORAS (Soprano)
AMONG Belgian composers of today, a high place is taken by Joseph Jongen , who was born at Liege fifty-five years ago. During the War period, from 1914-1919, Jongen brought his family over to England, and many of his compositions were written here.
His Picturesque Scenes date from about this time. Nature and the open air seem to have stirred him more than once to musical painting, and in those four sketches we have delicate and charming examples of his art.








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