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Listings

: A MORNING CONCERT

THE DAVENTRY QUARTET
WINIFRED BURY (Soprano)
PERCY WHITEHEAD (Baritone)
PAT RYAN (Clarinet)

: AN ORGAN RECITAL

by OWEN LE P. FRANKLIN
Organist and Director of the Choir, St. Alban's,
Holbom. Relayed from St. Mary-le-Bow

: AN AFTERNOON CONCERT

HETTY BOLTON 'S TRIO
WINIFRED Bury (Soprano)
PERCY WHITEHEAD (Baritone)
PAT RYAN (Clarinet)

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

: Selections from
' Lilac Time ' (Schubert, arr. Clutsam), played by the Olof Sextet. ' A Mascot for the Fifth '—a School Story by Peter Martin. ' Another Adventure in M'Bung,' by Ralph de Rohan

: FRANK WESTFIELD'S ORCHESTRA

from the Prince of Wales Playhouse, Lewisham

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

MOZART'S VIOLIN SONATAS
Played by SAMUEL KUTCHER (Violin)
REGINALD PAUL (Pianoforte)
Sonata No. 4, in E Minor
Sonata No. 10, in B Flat (First Movement)

: Mr. LLOYD JAMES: At Work on an African Language (with Native Luganda Illustrations)

Listeners interested in phonetics know Mr. Lloyd James as the Secretary of the B.B.C.'s Advisory Committee on Pronunciation and the giver of an interesting series of talks to schools on the English language.

He is also Lecturer in Phonetics at the School of Oriental Studies, and in this evening's talk he will describe the interesting method of research into some of those African languages that can only be studied phonetically, since they have never been written down. An interesting feature of this broadcast will be the illustrations by a native Luganda speaker.

: NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERT

THE HALLÉ ORCHESTRA
Conducted by SIR HAMILTON HARTY
HABOLD WILLIAMS (Baritone)
Relayed from THE QUEEN'S HALL, London
THE FIRST MOVEMENT of Beethoven's Fifth
Symphony is troubled, nervous sort of music—'the disordered sentiments which overthrow a great soul, a prey to despair,' said Berlioz. Its first four gruff notes, known as ' Fate knocking at the door,' are famous among musicians, as a concentrated, significant, and entirely unique idea.
The SECOND MOVEMENT is a scries of connected
Variations on a long-drawn Theme that has two distinct sections, the first a sinuous melody, and the second suggestive of a fanfare.
The THIRD MOVEMENT is a Scherzo, a word that means ' a jest,' and became attached, as a formal term, to the light-styled, quick Movement that was usually found in the middle of a Symphony. Here, however, it is grim jesting, and there is no feeling of relaxed tension. It was by such movements as these that Beethoven raised the Scherzo from the air of triviality with which it first entered into the Symphonic scheme, and brought it to full rank as a musical composition,
At tho end of it comes a mysterious, whispered passage that gradually takes the music out of C Minor into C Major and leads into the blaze of the FOURTH MOVEMENT, a triumphal psean that sustains the note of exhilaration from beginning to end, except for a moment where Beethoven brings in a few bars of the Scherzo. The ending is a rattling and a pounding of C Major chords without a parallel in music.

: NATIONAL CONCERT

(Continued)
THE Faust Overture was written in Paris in 1840 (when Wagner was twenty-seven) in the midst of opposition and failure. It was originally designed as the first movement of a 'Faust Symphony,' and was rewritten in 1853. The subject is, of course. Gœnthe's story of Faust, . who is tempted to sell his soul for renewed youth. The peaceful ending may, perhaps, represent his final redemption.
HANS SACHS , the cobbler-poet of Nuremberg, is championing the cause of the young knight Walter, whom some of the pedantic Mastersingers are chary of welcoming to their Guild. Early in the morning of Midsummer Day Sachs sits in his room, a great volume on his lap, and meditates on men's incessant, bitter strife with one another, and considers how he may turn it to the ends he has in view-the furthering of Walter's fortunes with the Guild, and helping the youth to win the maiden he loves.
WHEN Wagner was about twenty-six he visited
London on his way from Riga to Paris. He had a very rough voyage from Riga to London.
The next year he started work on his Opera,
The Flying Dutchman, and the Overture to this work, which has been described as the finest storm music in existence, owes a good deal of its vividness to Wagner's stormy voyage of the year before.
The story of the Dutchman is more or less traditional. It can be traced back to at least the sixteenth century. Everyone is familiar with the legend of the reckless sea-captain who is condemned by Satan to sail until (in Wagner's version) lie finds a woman willing to share his fate. After many years he finds such a self-sacrificing woman, but wishing, in his love for her, to save her from a doom such as his, ho leaves her. She, howover, throws herself into the water to join him ; the spell is broken by her renunciation, and they find rest together.
The Overture is practically an epitome of the opera. A dominating figure is that of the Curse, heard in a strenuous call on the Brass against a quivering, stormy background of Strings. There is a contrasting, prayer-like tune, and also a gay sailor-song. These are all repeated with increasing force towards the end.

: VAUDEVILLE

GRACIE FIELDS (Comedienne)
FLELDS and Rossini (Entertainers)








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