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Listings

: THE LONDON RADIO DANCE BAND, directed by SIDNEY FIRMAN

MISHA MOTTE (Entertainer in Impersonations)

: Mrs. MARTIN HOLLAND: How to Improve our Villages-III, Disposal of Rubbish and Refuse'

SPIRITUALLY and materially alike, there is room for considerable improvement in the average English village before country life can be counted really attractive to the person of any aspirations or ideas. This series of talks is dealing with both sides of the question. The first dealt with transport and communications, the second with recreation, and this has for its subject one of the most material, but most essential reforms-the provision of a standard of sanitation worthy to be compared wich that of the town.

: A LIGHT CLASSICAL CONCERT

THE DAVENTRY STRING QUARTET
ELLIS BURFORD (Soprano) '
VIRGINIA McLEAN (Pianoforte)

: Air Ministry Talk : Mr. F. G. L. BERTRAM Deputy-Director of Civil Aviation, 'The International Control of Civil Flying '

A S civil flying expands-and its rapid expansion
A is the most striking feature of air history in the last few years-all sorts of new problems arise connected with the international control of the traffic of the air. This question will be the subject of Mr. Bertram's talk.

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

BACH played by JAMES CHING
From ‘Musical Offering' :
Fugue in three parts
Fugue in six parts
BACH'S travels were never extensive, but whenever he went about Germany he was received with great honour. His last journey, made in 1747, when ho was sixty-two, was to see Frederick the Great. The King had suggested to Bach's son Emmanuel, who held a post at his court, that he would much like to receive the great man. Frederick was .himself a musician, a flute player and composer. He made Bach try all his ' forte-pianos ' (and later all the organs in Potsdam).
The old man asked the King for a theme, and on the spot extemporized a fugue on it, to the monarch's great delight. When he came home. he wrote out several workings of the King's theme, had the pieces printed and bound, and dedicated them to Frederick, entitling them Musical Offering.
Altogether there are Fugues in two, three and six parts, eight Canons for keyboard and one for Flute, Violin and Bass, with a Sonata for the same three instruments.
The freedom of style in the three-part Fugue, which we are to hear first, suggests that Bach left this pretty much as he improvised it before the King, on the latter's theme. It is probably the only example we have of Bach's style in improvisation.
The Fugue in six parts, also on the theme invented by the King, is closely and richly woven, and very cleverly designed so as to be playable by two hands. It ' runs on velvet,' as the saying goes.

: Mr. KINGSLEY MARTIN: What Society Means-Political Symbols.' S.B. from Manchester

IF men were altogether rational and applied their logical powers to every idea presented to them, this would be a very different world. Actually, reason is often suspended in favour of traditional loyalties, instincts, and prejudices, and political affairs are governed nearly as much by symbols as by reasoned ideas. In this talk Mr. Kingsley Martin will discuss these political symbols, their use and their abuse.

: VARIETY

HAMILTON SISTERS and FORDYCE
(From the Vaudeville Revue, Blue Skies)

: 'PENELOPE'

A Lyric Drama in Two Acts by HERBERT FERRERS Dramatis Personæ (in order of their speaking) :
Chorus of Princes, Suitors to Penelope
ACT I. On the Coast of Ithaka
ACT II. Scenes 1 and 2. The Great Hall of the Palace, Ithaka
A slight pause is made between Scenes 1 and 2 to mark the passage of some hours.
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
(Chorus-Master, STANFORD ROBINSON ) The WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Leader, S. KNEALE KELLEY )
Under the direction of THE Composer
(For a description of the Opera see page 387)








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