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Listings

: AN ORGAN RECITAL

By LEONARD H. WARNER
Relayed from St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate

: Mr. J. A. WILLIAMSON and Mr. ERNEST YOUNG, ' Empire History and Geography '

GEOGRAPHY has always played an extremely largo part in the history of the B.itish
Empire, but never more so than in those days when the West Indies were being opened up by pioneers like the Cabots and adventurers like Hawkins and Drake. How much the foundation of the Empire in the Western Hemisphere owed to such geographical factors as the trade winds will be the subject of the talks today.

: TRANSMISSION TO SCHOOLS THE DRAMA

The second of a series of six Plays interpreted by representative Radio Players n. 'TWELFTH NIGHT'
The Players: Douglas BURBIDGE ; LILIAN HARRISON ; ABRAHAM SOFAER ; J. ADRIAN BYRNE ROBERT SPEAIGHT : ALFRED CLARK ; WILFRED FLETCHER ;HOWARD ROSE ; REGINALD TATE : EWART SCOTT ; DOROTHY FRESHWATER and DORIS BUCKLEY
THIS is the second of a series of six broadcasts, designed to give children all over the country the chance of hearing good plays well acted.

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

: Songs with Choruses, led by Dale Smith. The Story of ' A Holiday Venture' (William Johnstone)., 'The Stamp's Teeth, and How he Got them ' (W. H. Wosencroft)

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

Haydn Piano Sonatas
Played by E. KENDALL-TAYLOR

: Mr. ANTHONY ASQUITH : 'The Art cf the Cinema '—III

THE importance of the director in a film studio far transcends that of the producer in the theatre, as anyone ean confirm by noticing, for instance, the acting of the same stars under two such different directors as Griffith and Lang. Mr. Anthony Asquith will discuss the qualities of the ideal director with reference to those who have made names for themselves throughout the film world-such varying types as Chaplin, Fairbanks, Eisenstein, Griffith, Seastrom and Lang.

: NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERT

Relayed from the PEOPLE'S PALACE
A Wagner Programme
THE NATIONAL ORCHESTRA
Conducted by PERCY PITT
Part I
THE ORCHESTRA
Overture to ' Rienzi '
Bridal Procession (' Lohengrin ')
RIENZI, one of Wagner's earlier operas, is founded upon Bulwer Lyttpn 's novel of the same name. The Overture is stirring and strongly-coloured music.
After a few bars tf Introduction, we hear, very softly, a well-shaped, rather slow tune in the Violins (Rienzi's Prayer). This proceeds and is soon taken up, loudly, by the full Orchestra.
After a time, the music comes to a period, and makes a fresh start in a quick and energetic style. The Wind instruments have loud repeated chords, the 'Cellos and Double-basses do rapid downhill scales.
Soon after comes a very striking passage, in which the Brass alone thunder out the Call to Arms from the opera.
Then comes the Rienzi's Prayer tune again
(but quicker this time than before), and after that the Call to Arms again, and tl.en a stirring, march-like tune, at first in Strings and Woodwind softly, but soon afterwards by all the instruments < f the Orchestra, as loudly as they can do it.
MIRIAM LICETTE (Soprano)
Elizabeth's Greeting (' Tannhauser ')
IN the first Act of the Opera we see how the Knight of Song, Tannhauser, whom Elizabeth loved, falls for a time under the spell of Venus. Presently, growing weary of her enchantments, he returns to his fellow men, and learns that Elizabeth continues to mourn his absence. At the beginning of the Second Act, Elizabeth
. enters the Hall of Song at the Castle of Wartburg and greets it as the scene of Tannhauscr's former triumphs of minstrelsy. Now, she sings, hope is alight once more, for her loved ore has returned.
THE ORCHESTRA
Forest Murmurs (' Siegfried ')
QIEGFRIED, the hero, having killed a dragon and tasted the' monster's blood, is able to understand the voices of nature. Resting under a tree, he listens to the murmur of the forest's life. He would imitate the birds' son?s, and cuts himself a reed from which he fashions a pipe. Then his thoughts turn to his mother, who died when he was born, and the music clouds over for a moment. only to resume its sunny course with a new theme. The whole episode is cne of the loveliest scenes that Wagner ever wrote.
WALTER WIDDOP (Tenor)
Prize Song from The Mastersingers '
THE ORCHESTRA ,
Prelude and Isolde's Death ('Tristan and Isolde ')

: NATIONAL CONCERT

(Continued)
Part II
THE ORCHESTRA
Siegfried's Ordeal (' Siegfried ')
Prelude and First Scene, Act III (' Lohengrin ')
MIRIAM LICETTE :
Elsa WALTER WIDDOP : Lohengrin
ARMED with his magic sword, Siegfried fights and cuts his way through the flames that for many yenrs have encircled a high roek at the top of which sleeps Brünnhilde. waiting for the hero who will brave the ordeal and waken her to be his bride.
THE knight Lohengrin, having come to the aid of Elsa, that wrongly-accused maiden, has married her, though he has never told his name. The Prelude to the third Act strikes the note of the festivity that follows en the marriage. Then the curtain goes up en the bridal procession. After the rich procession of ladies and nobles has gone, there is a love duet of great beauty. Elsa urges her husband to tell her his name, and whence he comes, but he gently refuses,
Then there is a dramatic interruption. Count
Frederick, who accused Elsa of the murder of her brother, bursts in, with some cf his nobles. Lohengrin kills him, and the ethers submit themselves to the knight. At the end of the scene, Lohengrin bids Elsa's ladies attire her for a meeting with him before the king. at which he will answer her questions. Elsa is left in sadness at the tragedy she has beheld.
THE ORCHESTRA
Good Friday Music (' Parsifal Imperial March
THE Good Friday Music from Parsiful is an episode of peace and beatitude amid the scenes of strife and anguish of Wagner's sacred music-drama. Parsifal, the hero, has won a great victory over sin and enchantment for himself nnd for the woman Kundry ; they and Gurnemanz, an attendant on the Holy Grail, join in colloquy by the wayside.

: IRENE SCHARRER

A Farewell Pianoforte Recital
(Picture on page 37.)








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