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: ORGAN RECITAL

by EDGAR T. COOK
Relayed from Southwark Cathedral

: 'Boys and Girls of the Middle Ages—The Training of a Squire,' by RHODA Poweb

LAST winter Miss Rhoda Power broadcast an interesting series of talks on ' Village
Life in Olden Times.' In the series that she begins this afternoon she will deal in turn with the gentry, the religious and learned, the country people and the commercial classes, devoting several talks to each section. Listeners will find at the end of her course that they have gradually built up for themselves a very* convincing picture of the state of life and the mental and physical environment of a boy or girl in mediaeval England.

: Great Stories, by Mr. J. C. STOBART and Miss MARY SOMERVILLE

THE first of these ' Great Stories is that of Persephone (or Proserpine, as the Romans later called her), who in Greek myth was the bride of Pluto, the monarch of Hell.

: Thé Dansant

The London Radio Dance Band, directed by Sidney Firman. The Royal Automobile Club Dance Band, from the Royal Automobile Club

: Household Talk : Coming Fashions,' by Miss E. V. Rose

THE Atlantic flyer does not watch the weather reports, nor the cotton-merchant the first estimates of the Nile flood, more intently than the woman of fashion-and that includes most women-watches for the first hints and forecasts of Fashion's newest decrees. Miss Rose has access to inside information, and her talk will be a particularly interesting one.

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

Piano Solos by Cecil Dixon . Songs by Julian Livingston . The Story of the First Rabbit ' (F. G. G.). ' Keeping Fit '-how to get the best out of Life, by George Nicol

: ORGAN RECITAL

By PATTMAN
From THE ASTORIA CINEMA

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

ORGAN RECITAL . by EDGAR T. COOK
Relayed from Southwark Cathedral

: John Gilpin

A Ballad for Chorus and Orchestra
Poem by WILLIAM COWPER
Set to Music by FREDERIC H. COWEN
Followed by:— 'THE PIED PIPER OF HAMELIN'
A Cantata for Tenor, Bass, Chorus and Orchestra
Poem by ROBERT BROWNING
Set to Music by HUBERT PARRY
THE STATION CHORUS. Chorus Master,
S. H. WHITTAKER
THE AUGMENTED STATION ORCHESTRA, conducted by T. H. MORRISON
S.B. from Manchester

: ENGLISH CHAMBER MUSIC

THE ENGLISH SINGERS:
FLORA MANN; NELLIE CARSON; LILIAN BERGER; NORMAN STONE; NORMAN NOTLEY; CUTHBERT KELLEY. THE INTERNATIONAL STRING QUARTET:
ANDRE MANGEOT and BORIS PECKER (violins); FRANK HOWARD (violin); HERBERT WITHERS ('cello)
THERE was chamber music in England before Purcell's day, but none so fresh and striking as his. Purcell's was an inquiring, experimental mind, capable of singularly bold and beautiful thoughts, as everyone must realize who has heard, for instance, Dido's Lament, from Dido and Eneas, an air that has frequently been broadcast. Though chamber music for the family of Viols (precursors 'of the Violin tribe) was written in Tudor and Elizabethan times, its range, emotional and technical, was not very wide. In the days of the Restoration it fell into disfavour, for Charles II and his contemporaries cared for nothing very serious or in the least complex. In Purcell's Fantasias the composer revived the chamber music style, and though he did not live long enough, and had insufficient capable followers, to make it highly populal here, he left us some delightful works for concerted strings. A number of these has recently been published, and we are now to hear one of them.
PERHAPS most people remember Charles Wood as the composer of that stirring song Ethiopia Saluting the Colours, and of many part-songs. Besides writing a great quantity of music, he was famous for many years as a teacher. He taught some of our leading present-day composers, such as Vaughan Williams; and in 1924 he succeeded Stanford as Professor of Music at Cambridge University. He held the post only two years, dying in 1926. Like Stanford, he was an Irishman who settled in England, and who collected and edited a great many beautiful Irish tunes. One at least of his String Quartets used an Irish melody as the basis for Variations.
He began to write chamber music when he was a student at the Royal College (about 1885), and though he suppressed a number of works written in what may be called his 'middle period', there are several quartets belonging to the last fourteen years of his life that might well be more frequently played.
IN the small amount of chamber music Vaughan Williams has written we find a sensitive, original, personal quality, and a freedom of harmony that often leads to rugged effect, though never to ugliness.
There are four Movements in this Quartet - a bold and tuneful opening movement, a graceful Minuet and Trio, a flowing slow movement beginning in five-time, with a middle section in three-time that achieves a strong climax, and a lively Rondo as Finale.

THE QUARTET Two Fantasias for Strings (Edited by Peter Warlock and Andre Mangeot) - Purcell
9.50 THE ENGLISH SINGERS Madrigals and Ballet : Sweet honey-sucking bees - John Wilbyi
The Silver Swan - Orlando Gibbons
Sing, shepherd, after me - Thomas Weelkes
10.0 THE QUARTET String Quartet - Charles Wood
10.15 THE ENGLISH SINGERS Folk-songs : Alister McAlpine's Lament - arr. Vaughan Williams
Brigg Fair - arr. Percy Grainger
Just as the tide was flowing - arr. Vaughan Williams
10.25-11.0 THE QUARTET String Quartet in G Minor - Vaughan Williams








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

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This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

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