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: POPULAR CLASSICS

THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA, conducted by John ANSELL ; ISABEL I'ANSON (Soprano) ; WOLF
WOLFINSOHN (Violin)
BEETHOVEN wrote at various times four different Overtures to his one Opera.
Fidelio (at first called Leonora), and of one of these two versions exist. The present one, generally reckoned the greatest, is a very long Overture, fyilly developed on symphonic lines— too extended for use as a theatre Overture, perhaps, but a magnificent concert piece. There is a short slow Introduction, and then the vigorous main body of the Overture begins. There arc two chief tunes-the very soft and mysteriously
' opening one, and a succeeding smoothly-flowing one.
Note the dramatically interrupting Trumpet-call in the middle of the Overture (generally performed, in the concert room, by a player out of sight, behind the Orchestra) ; this represents the crucial moment in the play, when the Minister of State appears— just in time to save the hero from execution.
THE Hymn to St. Cecilia, in the form in which it is most frequently heard, has solo portions for Violin, Harp and (if it is available) Organ. Its chief theme, given out after a brief introduction, is developed to a strong climax, tc which succeeds a more tranquil section.
(Solo Violin: WOLF WOLFINSOHN)
A BOUT thirty years ago Sir Edward Elgar spent a holiday in Bavaria, and gave expression to his memories of that pleasant time in a Suite for Chorus and Orchestra, which he called From the Bavarian Highland..... Later he made an orchestral arrangement of three Dances from the Suite.
The First is just a gay Dance. The Second is a Lullaby. The Third is called The Marksmen, and shows us a lively scene of a village siiooting-matcn.
THE Eighth is the shortest of all Beethoven's Symphonies (excepting the First), and one of the most consistently gay.
The FOURTH MOVEMENT is much longer than any of the other three.'
There are two Main Tunes.
The First is the sparkling one with which the Movement opens, the Second the more sustained, song-like one, introduced by the First Violins, and then taken up by Fluts and Oboe.
Out of these two Tunes the whole Movement grows.
The orchestration is vivid and interesting, and sometimes humorous.

Contributors

Conducted By: John Ansell
Unknown: Sir Edward Elgar

: Richard CLOUDESLEY SAVAGE

Reading Poems hy WILLIAM BARNES ,
FRANCIS THOMPSON and ALFRED NOYES
MR. SAVAGE is already known to the London radio public for his broadcast from the works of William Barnes , the Dorset poet. He has himself published a volume of poetry in the Dorset dialect, and he is also the author of ' Casements,' a volume of translations from French verse that was very highly praised by the reviewers on its appearance not very long ago. Today, in addition to Barnes, he will read from the works of Francis Thompson , the ecstatic, who wrote ' The Hound of Heaven,' and of Alfred Noyes. one of the best-known poets of the present day

Contributors

Unknown: William Barnes
Unknown: Francis Thompson
Unknown: Alfred Noyes
Unknown: William Barnes
Unknown: Francis Thompson
Unknown: Alfred Noyes.

: AN ORGAN RECITAL

By HAROLD E. DARKE , Mus.Doc.
Relayed from St. Michael's, Cornhill

Contributors

Unknown: Harold E. Darke

: A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From the Studio
Hymn, ' At the Name of Jesus' (Tune : Kings
West on ') Bible Reading
Psalm 8
The Lord's Prayer
Hymn. ' Jesu. Lover of my Soul' (Tune.
'Aberystwyth')
Address by the Rev. A. J. MAYO , Rector of Whitechapol
Hymn, ' For the Beauty of the Earth'
Benediction
Sevenfold Amea
A long ago as Christmas, 1922. the Rev. A. J. Mayo preached his first radio sermon, and ever since then he has remained a consistent enthusiast for broadcasting. His church— the conspicuous parish church of Whitechapel, well known by sight to so many Londoners—has been the scene of broadcast carol-singing on several occasions, notably last Christmas Eve. '

Contributors

Unknown: Rev. A. J. Mayo
Unknown: Rev. A. J. Mayo

: THE WEEK'S GOOD Cause :

Appeal on behalf of the Ross Institute and Hospital for Tropical Diseases (Incorporated) by the Duchess of Portland

THE Ross Institute was founded to carry on. the great work, begun by Sir Ronald Ross. of research into the causes and treatment of malaria and the other diseases that are the cursa of life in the tropics. The importance of this work may seem remote to those to whom the tropics are no more than a name, but it is very real to the men who go out to unhealthy climates to work for the great industries, such as oil, rubber, and tea, whose products are so important in our national life.
Contributions should be addressed to [address removed]

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Ronald Ross.

: ALBERT SANDLER

THE GRAND HOTEL. EASTBOURNE,
ORCHESTRA
JOHN THORNE (Baritone)
Relayed from the Grand Hotel, Eastbourne

Contributors

Baritone: John Thorne








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