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: ORGAN RECITAL

by EDGAR T. COOK
HAROLD S. DENTON (Baritone)
Relayed from Southwark Cathedral

Contributors

Unknown: Edgar T. Cook
Baritone: Harold S. Denton

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

: .Piano Solos by Cecil Dixon. Songs by Denis O'Neil. 'The Two Bob-Cats' (John Gals-worthy). ' The General
Principles of Lawn
Tennis,' by Mrs. Lambert Chambers

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

The Sonatas of Beethoven
THOUGH Haydn and Mozart (whose music we have been hearing recently in this series) put grace, gaiety, and sometimes deep feeling into their sonatas, it was not in these that their powers as emotional artists were best exhibited. The chief way in which the Sonatas of Beethoven overtop those of his forerunners is in their deeper emotional and dramatic life.
There is a certain amount of value in roughly dividing Beethoven's works into three ' periods ' -the First, that in which he is learning his job, so to speak, showing the influence of the styles of Haydn (whose pupil he was for a time), and of Mozart, but using their general lines of construction and their harmonies with quickly growing individuality. In this period we may conveniently place his Sonatas from Op. 2 (the first) to Op. 22. In the Second Period (that in which he becomes a full, free citizen of his empire, complete master of his resources, mature in thought and expression) we may place Op. 26 to 90 ; and in the Third Period, the last five Sonatas, Op. 101. 106, 109. 110, and 111. in which wo find tho giant adapting and moulding the old forms (sometimes breaking the moulds altogether and creating now), and reaching out to heights of expression to which no musician has ever before aspired.

: Chamber Music

RECITAL by THE LONDON WIND QUINTET
ROBERT MURCHIE (Flute); LEON GOOSSENS (Oboe); HAYDN DRAPER (Clarinet); FRED WOOD (Bassoon); AUBREY BRAIN (Horn); VICTOR HELY-HUTCHINSON (Pianoforte); FLORENCE HOLDING (Soprano)
In Handel's day the Oboe was a very important orchestral instrument, and there were some very fine players upon it. Chamber music, for a few instruments only, was not then so popular as it became under Haydn and Mozart; but as the Oboe was one of Handel's favourite instruments, he wrote several Sonatas for it, with Harpsichord accompaniment.
The Sonata in his day, of course, was not the fully-developed affair that Haydn and Beethoven made it. It was more like a Suite of four Movements in contrasted moods, none of the four being at all elaborately constructed.
THIS is one of Beethoven's early works, in which he was exploring the possibilities of Chamber Music, for both Stringed and Wind instruments.
There are half-a-dozens Movement in the work, all containing a pleasant tincture of Mozart and Haydn.
First we have a lively and graceful Movement, next a lovely serene Slow Movement, and after that a Minuet.
Fourthly comes a set of Variations on a melody much like a folk-tune.
A Scherzo follows - a sort of gay, jesting Minuet; and then a few bars of March music bring in the brisk and brilliant Finale.

Contributors

Flute: Leon Goossens
Oboe: Haydn Draper
Clarinet: Fred Wood
Bassoon: Aubrey Brain
Pianoforte: Victor Hely-Hutchinson
Soprano: Florence Holding

: WEATHER FORECAST.

SECOND GENERAL News
BULLETIN ; Local Announcements '

: Mr. T. CLARKE, 'Canberra, —Australia's New Capital'

Like the United States of America. Australia has decided to locate its seat of Government, not in any great commercial city like London or Paris, but in a Federal capital devoted primarily to national buildings and the homes of public officials. For this purpose it has created the city of Canberra, the Australian Washington, planned on a scale worthy of the part that it is to play in the destinies of the Commonwealth. Today, twelve thousand miles away, the Duke and Duchess of York are formally inaugurating the new city, of which Mr. Tom Clarke (now Managing Editor of the Daily News), who spent three very pleasant years in Australia, will tell listeners tonight.

Contributors

Speaker: Mr. Tom Clarke

: MY PROGRAMME

By STACY AUMONIER
WRITERS of short stories of the first rank are. perhaps, even more rare than great novelists and great playwrights ; but Mr. Stacy Aumonier is without doubt one of them.
He is also very much interested in broadcasting, and has himself faced the microphone several times, so his idea of a good evening's programme should be worth staying in for.

Contributors

Unknown: Stacy Aumonier
Unknown: Mr. Stacy Aumonier








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

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