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: Light Orchestral Programme

The Wireless Orchestra, conducted by John Ansell.
Kate Winter (Soprano).
Edward Isaacs (Pianoforte)

Handel's oratorio Theodora, although it contains, as he himself maintained, some of his finest work, has never been popular.
One Air alone has remained popular - the one we are now to hear, 'Angela ever bright and fair, take, oh take me to your care.'
The background of the scene is this: Theodora, a Christian, has been ordered by the pagan Governor of Antioch to join in a sacrifice to Venus. She refuses, and in the Recitative that precedes this Air she begs her guards to lead her to the rack or the flames rather than to such profanation of her faith.

Schumann, in reviewing Mendelssohn's Preludes and Fugues, said something to the effect that 'that fugue is best which sounds like a waltz of Strauss.' He meant that science for which a fugue gives great scope, should never be obtruded - that a fugue should always sound spontaneous and free. These fugues of Mendelssohn are good examples, judged from that standpoint, and the skill in them is notable.
The Prelude to the E Minor Fugue (the two form No. 1 of Op. 35) is a swirl of arpeggio waters around a tune. Into the Fugue towards the end, after a fine climax has been reached, comes an unexpected visitor- a chorale, or hymn tune, which gives way finally to a reminiscence of the fugal treatment, and to a sweet and gentle closing passage.

About thirty years ago Sir Edward Elgar spent a holiday in Bavaria, and gave expression to his memories of that pleasant time in a Suite for Chorus and Orchestra, which he called From the Bavarian Highlands. Later he made an orchestral arrangement of three Dances from the Suite.
The First is just a gay Dance. The Second is a Lullaby. The Third is called The Marksmen, and shows us a lively scene of a village shooting-match.

Though the music for Shakespeare's Tempest was written in Sullivan's student days, it was only in 1903, after his death, that it was heard in connection with performances of the play, at the Court Theatre.

Contributors

Conducted By: John Ansell.
Conducted By: Kate Winter
Soprano: Edward Isaacs
Unknown: Sir Edward Elgar

: TALES FROM THE Old TESTAMENT

The Flight from Egypt, Exodus, xiv and xv

: CHILDREN'S SERVICE

Conducted by the Rev. STUART Robertson ", of Pollokshields West U.F. Church, Glasgow.
S.B. from Glasgow

Contributors

Unknown: Rev. Stuart Robertson

: Religious Service

Held in the London Studio and arranged by the NATIONAL BROTHERHOOD MOVEMENT
Chairman and Announcer:
THE RT. HON. THE LORD MAYOR OF LONDON,
Alderman Sir ROWLAND G. BLADES , M.P.
Order of Service :
Prayer (Mr. William HEAL)
Hymn, ' These Things Shall Be, A Loftier Race '
(Tune : 'Simeon (Fellowship Hymn Book, No. 34)
Reading of Scripture (Mrs. F. D. ALLEN , J.P.,
Gateshead)
Address by Mr. A. G. BARKER , National President
THE Acton BROTHERHOOD MALE VOICE CHOIR, conducted by Mr. WALKER ROBINSON
OUR MESSAGE TO THE NATION
(Read by Mr. SYDNEY WALTON , C.B.E.)
• THE Chairman
THE HAMMERSMITH BROTHERHOOD Orchestra,
Conducted by Mr. FRED Adlinoton
Hymn, Guide Me, 0 Thou Great Jehovah '
(Tune : ' Cvvm Rhondda (Fellowship Hymn Book, No. 127)
Benediction

Contributors

Unknown: Alderman Sir Rowland G. Blades
Scripture: Mrs. F. D. Allen
Unknown: Mr. A. G. Barker
Conducted By: Mr. Walker Robinson
Read By: Mr. Sydney Walton
Conducted By: Mr. Fred Adlinoton

: POPULAR ORCHESTRAL PROGRAMME

THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA, conducted by JOHN ANSELL ; REX PALMER (Baritone);
Daniel Melsa (Violin)

Contributors

Conducted By: John Ansell
Baritone: Rex Palmer
Baritone: Daniel Melsa








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

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This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

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